School of Psychology

MPsych (Hons) Human Neuroscience

Providing an immersive approach to human neuroscience, this course provides the knowledge, experience and the key practical neuroimaging/neurostimulation skills to prepare you for a career in neuroscience research. Built around our new Brain Research Imaging Centre (BRIC) you will gain a first-hand technical experience of a range of state-of-the-art neuroscience techniques, including fMRI, EEG, and TMS.

These will familiarise you with essential aspects of the neuroscientific process with experiment design and operational technique, data analysis and manipulation, through to dissemination of original findings. Elective modules allow you to tailor your experience to future careers, allowing specialisation in the physics of neuroimaging and current issues in cognitive and brain science.

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Careers with this subject

This programme provides the in-depth knowledge and practical training in human neuroimaging designed to put you on a path to a career in neuroscience. With an emphasis on hands-on learning, the direct experience gained using our new state-of-the-art neuroimaging facility will give you some of the most sought-after skills in the discipline. Advanced instruction in neuroimaging data manipulation, signal processing and interpretation then build on these operation skills. These provide a thorough understanding of the entire neuroscientific research cycle from design to dissemination that will give you a competitive advantage for further study.

Understanding where your degree subject could take you is an important first step in career planning. Due to the transferrable nature of the skills you gain from your studies, you may discover that there is a much wider range of opportunities open to you within this profession that you may first appreciate. Find out more about where your degree could take you.

Key features

  • Four year integrated masters programme, build the foundations of a thorough knowledge of psychology through the first three years of our BSc course, but then extend it with an additional year of masters level study specialising in Human Neuroscience.
  • Benefit from integration with our new BRIC, offering state-of-the-art facilities for fMRI, EEG, and other neuroscience techniques.
  • Our hands-on approach to learning embeds practical activities throughout the programme, with neuroimaging advanced practice providing hands-on experience in the operation of specialized equipment.
  • Work with world-leading neuroimaging researchers and engage in an original neuroscience research topic of your own choosing.
  • Elective modules allow you to shape the specialist neuroscientist you want to be.

Course details
  • Year 1

  • Your first-year modules provide a foundation of knowledge and skills across the breadth of psychology. Immersive modules integrate theory and practical workshops to provide a deeper exploration and of the psychology of learning and relationships. You will learn about the current debates in psychology, and how our knowledge connects and informs other disciplines.

    Core modules

    • Learning (PSYC411)

      This module explores how we gather information, with an emphasis on the scientific method. The module will introduce students to different perspectives on learning, including how to learn effectively, the biological and cognitive basis of learning, and social learning.

    • Psychological Science (PSYC412)

      This module will provide an introduction into a broad range of fundamental topics in psychology. Across eight independent topics, from across the entire breadth of psychology, students will learn key theories. Students will also learn how those theories have been applied to real-world situations and will be asked to explore these theories in practice in Labplus activities.

    • Debates in Psychology (PSYC413)

      This module covers both current and historical debates in topics drawn from across the breadth of psychology, involving discussion of theoretical issues and application and practice. The module will involve independent study sessions exploring some of the empirical differences seen in the literature and practice, and tutorial sessions will support extended writing development.

    • Relationships (PSYC414)

      This immersive module focuses on the Psychology of Social Relationships across the lifespan. This topic is introduced and analysed from different disciplines in Psychology, including Developmental, Social, Biological, Clinical and Individual Differences perspectives. Lectures introduce methodologies, key findings and concepts for understanding Social Relationships. Lectures will be supported by workshops and tutorials.

    • Topics in Psychology (PSYC415)

      This module will provide an in-depth exploration of four topics from core areas of psychology. Each of the topics will run for four weeks with interspersed group-based linked Labplus activities. These will allow students to get involved in a continued project, within the scope of a particular topic, which might involve data collection and subsequent statistical analysis of that data.

    • Connecting Psychology (PSYC416)

      This module will link psychology to other disciplines by exploring how the study of human and animal behaviour is investigated in collaboration with scientists and practitioners in a variety of other fields. A series of topics will be interspersed with independent study activities that allow students to get involved in a continued project, involving data collection and analysis.

  • Year 2

  • With a focus on developing research and practical skills. You will get additional hands-on experience in designing and testing your own experiments and get to grips with key concepts in cognitive, developmental, social, and clinical psychology.

    Core modules

    • Career and Placement Planning (CPIE202)

    • Cognition and Biological Psychology (PSYC513)

      This module covers four core areas of psychology each with 2 sub-topics: Perception & Attention; Learning & Memory; Cognition & Language; Neuroscience & Comparative Psychology. The biology of cognition will be covered within each of the four core areas, integrating them. Each core area will be covered in 12 hours of lectures. The first hour will cover CHIP issues and the last hour integration within/between topics.

    • Individual Differences, Social and Developmental Psychology (PSYC514)

      This module covers three core areas of psychology - individual differences, social cognition, and human development. Each core area will be covered in 16 hours of lectures. The first hour will cover CHIP issues and the last hour will focus on integration within/between topics.

    • Health and Wellbeing (PSYC515)

      The module explores the multiple factors that determine health-related behaviours, introducing professional areas of health, clinical and forensic psychology.

    • Applied Psychology (PSYC516)

      This module explores the contribution of psychology to success in education and work. It considers different approaches to educational assessment, risk communication, and behaviour change.

    • Research Skills in Practice 1 (PSYC519)

      In this module students develop an understanding of the processes involved in undertaking and communicating research of increasing complexity. Students work in supervised groups to develop research questions on the association of factors and test them using empirical methods. Results are communicated via both oral presentation and written report. Methods workshops are also provided.

    • Research Skills in Practice 2 (PSYC520)

      In this module students develop an understanding of the processes involved in undertaking and communicating research of increasing complexity. Students work in supervised groups to develop research questions on group differences and test them using empirical methods. Results are communicated via both oral presentation and written report means. Methods workshops are also provided.

  • Optional placement year

  • If you choose, you can take an optional work placement after your second year, applying your knowledge of psychology in a variety of real-world contexts offered through our established partners.

    Core modules

    • Placement: Psychology (CPIE501)

      During this 36 week placement, students will begin to apply their psychological knowledge in the workplace and develop the range of skills required to work within the specific placement setting. This zero-credit module is also home to timetabled careers talks and information for Stage 3 students who are away on placement.

  • Year 3

  • You can explore the areas of psychology and neuroscience that interest and benefit you the most, with complete freedom of choice across a wide range of current psychology and neuroscience topics, allowing you to shape the psychologist and neuroscientist you want to become. You will also work on a research question of your own choosing in a supervised psychology or neuroscience-focused research project.

    Core modules

    • Current Topics in Psychology 1 (PSYC601)

      This course allows students to develop an in depth and critical appreciation of two areas of psychological research (two topics drawn from the current research programmes of the School's staff).

    • Current Topics in Psychology 2 (PSYC602)

      This course allows students to develop an in depth and critical appreciation of two areas of psychological research (two topics drawn from the current research programmes of the School's staff).

    • Current Topics in Psychology 3 (PSYC603)

      This course allows students to develop an in depth and critical appreciation of two areas of psychological research (two topics drawn from the current research programmes of the School's staff).

    • Current Topics in Psychology 4 (PSYC604)

      This course allows students to develop an in depth and critical appreciation of two areas of psychological research (two topics drawn from the current research programmes of the School's staff).

    • Research Project (PSYC605)

      Students, supported by academic supervisors and specialist workshops, are required to conduct a complete piece of research, from establishing a research area, formulating a research question, conducting a literature search, designing and conducting a study that meets appropriate ethical standards, analysing the data and communicating the research verbally and in writing.

  • Final year

  • In the final year core modules deliver advanced instruction on the fundamental underpinnings of human neuroscience. In-depth knowledge of neuro-anatomy, pharmacology, and physiology provide the context for technical instruction on the applications of human neuroimaging techniques and data handling. Elective modules provide in-depth knowledge of the physics and key theoretical issues in neuroimaging research. These then form the basis for skills-based training in the practical aspects human neuroimaging, with hands-on advanced practice across a range of cutting-edge brain imaging methods. Finally, with supervision and guidance of world-class neuroimaging researchers you will bring your new knowledge and skills to bear on a research question of your own choosing in the neuroscience research project. 

    Core modules

    • Personal and Professional Development (PSYC750)

      This module will enhance students awareness of the transferable skills they possess, focus thinking about future employment, spur reflection on recent learning, and promote the effective use of feedback to enhance academic performance.

    • Foundations and Applications of Neuroimaging and Neurostimulation (PSYC775)

      This module provides an overview of key concepts in neuroscience that form the basis of neuroimaging and neurostimulation techniques. It also covers the key principles of major neuroimaging, neurostimulation techniques including electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and (functional) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/fMRI) illustrating their use in human neuroscience research with examples.

    • Advanced Practice in Neuroimaging and Neurostimulation (PSYC784)

      This research rotation module provides an immersive experience for students, enabling them to obtain first-hand experience of state-of-the-art neuroimaging & neurostimulation techniques through engagement with active research labs. Rotations will cover technical aspects of safety & data acquisition and enable students to engage with proper data collection, signal processing, & analyses based on technique-specific methods.

    • Neuroscience Project (PSYC785)

      In this module, students select, develop, and carry out an original group research project on a topic associated with their specialist area of interest using a neuroimaging or neurostimulation technique. The module comprises an independent piece of research work conducted by the students within a group and written up as an independent research paper.

    Optional modules

    • Issues in Cognitive and Brain Science (PSYC771)

      This module focuses on how cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience approaches and techniques can be combined to provide convergent evidence for understanding the mind.

    • The Physics of Neuroimaging (PSYC778)

      This module covers advanced knowledge of the biophysical principles underpinning non-invasive neuroimaging & neurostimulation techniques that are widely used in human neuroscience. This relates to image formation, optimization, acquisition & processing for imaging methods & to parametrization for stimulation methods.

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

The following programme specification represents the latest course structure and may be subject to change:

MPsych Hons Human Neuroscience Programme Specification 6807

The modules shown for this course are those currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new modules. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to amendment from time to time as part of the University’s curriculum enrichment programme and in line with changes in the University’s policies and requirements.

In light of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the changeable nature of the situation and any updates to government guidance, we may need to make further, last minute adjustments to how we deliver our teaching and learning on some or all of our programmes, at any time during the academic year. We want to reassure you that even if we do have to adjust the way in which we teach our programmes, we will be working to maintain the quality of the student learning experience and learning outcomes at all times.
Entry requirements

UCAS tariff

120 - 128

A level
120–128 points from a minimum of three A levels from any subjects (excluding General Studies).

BTEC 18 Unit National Diploma/QCF Extended Diploma
DDM – any subject

International Baccalaureate
30 points overall

Access courses
Pass Access to HE Science/Combined Science/Humanities/Social Sciences course with 60 credits overall, to include 45 credits at Level 3, of which 30 credits must be at distinction and 15 credits at merit or higher.

GCSE
5 GCSE subjects at a pass are preferred and this does not necessarily need to be Mathematics and English subjects.

Other
English Advanced 4+ (A1) or 5 (A2/B); Standard 5+ (A1) or 6 (A2/B). Maths – Standard 4.


Extended entry requirements

Other international qualifications considered – please contact admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.

Fees, costs and funding

The UK is no longer part of the European Union. EU applicants should refer to our Brexit information to understand the implications.

New Student 2021 2022
Home £9,250 To be confirmed
International £14,200 To be confirmed
Part time (Home) £770 To be confirmed
Full time fees shown are per annum. Part time fees shown are per 10 credits. Please note that fees are reviewed on an annual basis. Fees and the conditions that apply to them shown in the prospectus are correct at the time of going to print. Fees shown on the web are the most up to date but are still subject to change in exceptional circumstances. For more information about fees and funding please visit www.plymouth.ac.uk/money.

Additional costs

This course is delivered by the Faculty of Health and more details of any additional costs associated with the faculty's courses are listed on the following page: Faculty of Health additional costs.

How to apply
All applications for undergraduate courses are made through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). 

UCAS will ask for the information contained in the box at the top of this course page including the UCAS course code and the institution code. 

To apply for this course and for more information about submitting an application including application deadline dates, please visit the UCAS website.

Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email international-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.

Why choose Plymouth?

We've redesigned the way we teach psychology. We have listened to feedback from our students and created a curriculum where the focus is on active learning instead of attending lectures. As well as this hands-on approach there are many aspects to the course that we are immensely proud of. 

Specialist Facilities
We have 22 specialist laboratories which can be booked by students and staff. Labs range from single participant rooms through to labs with a range of networked or standalone computers and social interaction or group participation rooms.

Placement Year
All of our psychology students can opt to take a voluntary placement year, so you do not have to apply for a particular course. You will gain invaluable experience and cultivate professional contacts. The process starts in your second year, with information sessions to help you decide if a placement year is right for you.

Psychology Research Apprenticeship Scheme

Every year around 60-70 first and second-year students volunteer to work with a member of staff as a 'Research Apprentice'. With this informally run scheme, you'll get first-hand experience of carrying out research – everything from literature searching through experimental design and data collection to analysis and even publishing papers.

Peer Assisted Learning Scheme (PALS)
Learning alongside other students on your course can give you a greater opportunity to discuss ideas, broaden your knowledge, gain confidence and make friends. You will benefit from regular, coordinated Peer-Led Study Sessions planned and delivered by student PALS leaders from the academic year above. Your group will be small enough to work together, discussing ideas, completing tasks and checking understanding in a relaxed and friendly environment.

Discover psychology at Plymouth and explore our open days

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Research in the School of Psychology

Plymouth is a centre of excellence in psychological research. In the last Research Excellence Framework assessment over 80% of our research outputs were rated as either international (3*) or world-leading (4*) quality. This puts us in the top 20 nationally on this measure, and above institutions such as Bristol, UCL, Manchester, Southampton, Bournemouth, and Portsmouth.

We have a thriving PhD community, with around 80 doctoral students, purpose-built research facilities.

Learn more about the research in the School of Psychology

Brain Research & Imaging Centre

The Brain Research & Imaging Centre (BRIC), the most advanced multi-modal brain imaging facility in the South West, will provide the sea-change to enhance the quality of our research in human neuroscience.

With seven cutting-edge human research laboratories, BRIC will include an MRI suite with the most advanced 3-Tesla scanner in the region. It will critically advance our enquiry toward the most advanced brain research, improved radiological diagnostics and better patient care.

Find out more about the facility

Our labs

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