Finding the right formula to profit from Plymouth

I’m ready to be inspired by my course

I live in Plymouth – this is my local university. I felt connected to the University even before I received my unconditional offer. Coming to the campus for maths masterclasses and work experience while still at school gave me an indication of what the teaching was like and where things were. In many ways, these were my first stepping-stones towards becoming a student here.

I have always had a real passion for numbers and having an answer for everything – mathematics is the subject I have found the most fulfilling.

Even though Plymouth was a strong option from the outset, I did look around at courses at other institutions. The most important aspect when looking at universities was the course content and the range of opportunities available.

I identified early that economics would build upon my love of mathematics and that it was important for me to find a course that would enable me to channel my interest in the humanities, having studied history and geography at A level.

After considering multiple options, Plymouth remained the best choice for me due to the quality of the BSc (Hons) Economics course content as well as the course’s flexible structure of optional modules, which will allow me to carve a personal pathway that will guide me towards graduation and beyond.

I have not decided my module specialisms or even a particular future job role yet – I am sure that as I progress through the course, a spark will ignite and point me towards a more specialised career pathway. Whether a particular module, a placement experience (another big pull for me to come here) or advice from tutors, I am ready to be inspired by my course.

<p>Campus entrance Roland Levinsky<br></p>
Economics

Open days will open eyes

I feel that many people may not always be completely aware of what their local university has to offer. Compared to other courses I looked at, Plymouth just had a lot more going for it.

I would recommend visiting an open day, even if you are local to the university. They are a great chance to soak in the campus atmosphere and to ask questions. Also, take some time to view the course web pages. I found it useful to find out everything I needed – much more convenient than flicking through a prospectus. The website also has clear information on how to apply, what you need to do and how to start your study here. In addition, there are great graduate profiles that give an indication of potential career routes.

<p>Shahana Hannan</p>
<p>Drake's Place in the sunshine</p>

An equation for perfect preparation 

The summer before starting my course was a unique one for me. I had worked hard to achieve my A level grades and I was preparing for the future, filled with mixed emotions – I felt excited and scared in equal measure. In a few weeks’ time, I was going to university – the next big milestone in my life.

The past summer I have allowed myself to get back into the things that I was restricted of during the intense exam season. Having some ‘me time’ has always been important, whether losing myself in the latest best-selling book or exploring new areas of the South West, going for runs and walks.

I prepared for university the best I could, relaxing and hanging out with my friends, seeking greater independence, from finding a job to beginning to learn to drive. I am now a few months into my course at Plymouth and I feel very settled – I am surprised with how well I have adjusted.

<p>Shahana Hannan</p>
<p>Shahana Saltram</p>

Greater than the sum of its parts

Plymouth has a good balance of the things that I want in an area. With the sea on one side and the countryside on the other, the surrounding location is one of the University’s greatest strengths.

Living locally means I can stay at home for my first year, which will help me out financially. Perhaps in the second year, once I become closer with new friends, I will want to move out – for now though, the convenience really suits me. It has meant that making new friends is a little bit harder, because many students are living together and are getting to know each other that way.

Making friends with people on my course is probably the most important thing for me right now. It is great to be able to meet new people and help them explore the city I have lived in for 18 years.

Perhaps the best part about staying in the city I have grown up in is that I know the place inside out and having my friends and family with me along the journey.

Starting university is a daunting experience, but for me it was nowhere near as scary as it would have been if I had chosen to move across the country. I am grateful to have family around me whilst I am still learning who I am.

<p>Shahana hannan</p>
<p>Students' Union</p><p>Freshers week</p>

Early integration

The first week of University consists of Freshers’ Week and induction, so meeting new people and preparing for my course is what I focused on.

What I had forgotten was that everyone was is the same position, so everyone was doing their best to fit in and get along with each other. The welcome party on the Hoe for the business students was a great opportunity to introduce the subject and the leaders to the students. Despite my hesitation, the night was fun, full of entertainment and great music.

Dear future, I’m ready

When you are an economics student, the dream company is the biggest company. I want to work my way up towards those heights and I am sure the University will support me on my journey.

This new beginning has been fun for me – you will not know what it is really like until you become a student. I have always known the city’s great, and my experience here so far is proving that the University is great too.