Rebecca Hall - BSc International Relations with Sociology graduate

Current employer: Self-employed / Rough Guides Travel Guidebooks (Freelance)

Current job title: Freelance Travel Writer / Author / English Language Teacher

Current location: Athens, Greece

“I love that I can travel to various countries around the world and work, either as a travel writer or as an English language teacher. It means that I can integrate into society and learn from other cultures – thus grow in myself.”

Tell us about your career path since graduation.

I have been an English language teacher to Greek students and a Cambridge University English language oral examiner. I also spent about two months in Cairo, Egypt, teaching summer school. I am now a part time EFL (English as a foreign language) teacher and freelance writer.

Has your career path changed since graduation?

I never really had a career path. I was a mature student so had had various careers before University. I learnt earlier on in life to stop trying so hard and to let life run its course. It’s worked very well so far.

What is the best, most exciting or fun thing that you have done in your career?

I love that I can travel to various countries around the world and work, either as a travel writer or as an English language teacher. It means that I can integrate into society and learn from other cultures – thus grow in myself.

Oh! And being the only passenger on a container ship with 27 all male crew from Athens to Hong Kong for 37 days as part of a writing assignment. We went through the pirate zone and had to have security guards on board for ten days. One of them was from Plymouth.  I love the slightly crazy things I get to do – but don’t feel unsafe. That trip was the best one in my life, ever. I got to become one of the crew – and felt like I had made a whole new family.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to get in to the same line of work?

Be patient, keep pitching people and it really is about who you know. Make connections, follow up on leads, and be polite and professional (even when you’re rejected for the 100th time).

How did studying at Plymouth help you?

Critical thinking was encouraged – and this is important. Never stop questioning in life: the system, society, other people. My educational experience at Plymouth University honed critical thinking skills.

What is your favourite memory of studying at Plymouth?

The variety of people I met on my course. Due to the subject, it attracted both young and mature students and therefore was very diverse.

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