Hibiki Hideout and Flying Carpet

Year 2 students - Elinor Aikman, Sebastiano Carboni, Yasmine Jelley, Jacob Lacey, Emilie Latulippe, Jack Richards and Ateeb Shakeel - have completed the planning drawings for the Flying Carpet and Hibiki Hideout as part of Fingle Woods Interpretation Centre competition. The brief was written by the clients at Fingle Woods who also work with both the National Trust and Woodland Trust. The project was a collaboration between BA (Hons) Architecture, BA (Hons) Illustration and BA (Hons) Creative Writing with English students.

The task was to develop one of three possible ideas for an interpretation build on site. The three options were: mobile exhibition and interpretation space; viewing platform in the woods; and, school’s area. The students visited the site in March, and the entire project work was undertaken over the Easter break in the first 4 weeks of ‘lockdown’. Presenting to the client group via zoom and selection of winning design occurred in April 2020. The project - Hibiki Hideout and Flying Carpet - was described as nailing the brief, the judges were “completely bowled over”. The build of both elements using sustainable Fingle Woods sourced Douglas fir will take place between October and December 2020.

The Hibiki Hideout offers users an intimate space to look over the river and gaze up at the tree canopies whilst listening to the full acoustics of the interaction between the brook and the river. The key users of this structure will be those local to Fingle Woods as well as the people working with the national and woodland trust teams to aid recovery from mental health illnesses. The Hibiki Hideout will sit upon Rivermead, a meadow close to the river Teign. 

The Flying Carpet offers users of the Fingle Wood trails a place to stop, sit, recover and enjoy the surrounding sights of which they are immersed in. The structure is positioned to allow views of the trees above, giving visitors a new perspective of beech trees found a short walk from the Sawmill at Fingle Woods.