Project shortlisted for prestigious award combines beauty and function to help banish winter blues

A student design that mimics the rhythm of daylight to reduce Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) has been shortlisted for a prestigious prize run by luxury Swiss watchmaker Rado.

Final year BA (Hons) 3D Design student James Moseley is in the running for the 2018 Rado Star Prize UK. James is one of just ten up and coming designers shortlisted, and as a result will exhibit his work at designjunction from 20 to 23 September 2018, during London Design Festival.

If his project, named API is chosen as the judges’ winner, he will receive £5,000 in prize money and a Rado watch. An additional public winner, picked by those attending designjunction will also receive a watch.

By aesthetically combining colour, movement and the use of quality materials, James’ design is intended to contrast with the utilitarian ‘plastic’ look of existing SAD products. Made from dichroic glass, anodised aluminium and waterjet cut steel, the design uses an Arduino processor to control the projection of blue and red light, reproducing morning and evening light respectively, and fading between the two over the course of the day.

James has constructed three prototypes, which he exhibited at New Designers in the Business Design Centre, Islington, earlier this month.

James said: “I particularly like working in hard-wearing materials like metals and woods, and I think that if something is made well it can last beyond a human lifetime. Quality comes from the passion of the designer, and I believe I can transfer both passion and quality into the things I create.

“I have found myself designing and making mostly lighting objects, trying to manipulate the way that light interacts with us, and how we interact with the objects.

“This product incorporates the motion of nature's light cycle, and how it interacts with movement of the user’s body. I’ve focused on aesthetics, taking away the white plastic that is usually used and adding warmer materials and colours.”

“Through the project, I realised that it was more interesting to influence the mindset of the user rather than clinically treating them.”

Roy Tam, Associate Head of School (Marketing and Recruitment), School of Art, Design and Architecture said: “This is not just a light but a point of view. James’ design not only has health benefits but also embeds the latest technology within a treasurable object.”

To read more about and cast your vote for API, visit the Rado Star Prize website.

For more images and information follow @j.a.m.design on Instagram.

"I think that if something is made well it can last beyond a human lifetime. Quality comes from the passion of the designer, and I believe I can transfer both passion and quality into the things I create."

- James Moseley

James Moseley's API

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