Caught between the Devil and the deep blue sea at COP26
4 Nov 2021 17:30–18:00
Jacques Finnieston, 1146 Argyle Street, Finnieston, Glasgow, G3 8TF
Jason Hall-Spencer , Professor of Marine Biology, is one of the world’s leading experts investigating the major stressors affecting the health of our seas and the marine organisms impacted by climate change. Attending COP26, he joined this event with the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition and Greenlit.
The event was hosted by Kieran Andrews, Scottish Political Editor at The Times and discussed the ocean as the last bastion against climate change.

Professor Jason Hall-Spencer

Professor of Marine Biology, Jason is one of the world’s leading experts investigating the major stressors affecting the health of our seas and the marine organisms impacted by climate change. Jason’s pioneering technique of using underwater volcanic areas high in CO2 as natural analogues for future climate change has become a sector standard, adopted in the Pacific, Caribbean and Europe. He has demonstrated how ocean acidification affects fish reproduction. Jason and his collaborators on RELIONMED are researching methods of tackling invasive lionfish that, due to the widening of the Suez Canal and rising sea temperatures, have populated the Mediterranean and disrupted the local ecosystem.

Professor Jason Hall-Spencer: Plymouth Pioneer

<p>Jason Hall-Spencer</p>

Supporting COP26 – United Nations Climate Change Conference 2021

The COP26 summit, held in Glasgow, Scotland from 31 October to 12 November 2021, brought parties together to accelerate action towards the goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on climate change.

The University of Plymouth is proud to be a part of the COP26 Universities Network whose mission it is to ensure that the UK academic sector plays its role in delivering a successful COP26, in order to deliver a zero-carbon, resilient world.

<p>COP26 logo</p>