Natasha Underwood
Profiles

Natasha Underwood

School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences (Faculty of Science and Engineering)

In 2015 I previously worked as a zoo keeper at the Tamar otter and wildlife park, and volunteered on weekends at the Cornwall Nature Conservancy prior. 

In 2016 I started my undergraduate degree in Conservation Biology at the Bath Spa University. My dissertation covered the development of a functional trait matrics for stream health in tropical freshwater streams.

Over the summer of 2017 I traveled to South Africa to volunteer as a research assistant on a project ran by Operation Wallacea. The aim of the project was to collect data on large mammal distributions and habitat utilization to estimate population numbers and create a predator/prey models for the reserve. 

During 2020 I completed my masters degree in environmental consultancy at the University of Plymouth. My dissertation reported on the riparian impacts of the reintroduced of Eurasian Beavers in the Tamar Catchment.

2021 I have started my PhD on the ecological and biogeochemical benefits of environmental enhancements at Moorlinch (and beyond) on the Somerset Levels. Researching the colonisation of the newly created wetland habitats and their effectiveness for water quality improvement, specifically phosphorus reduction and biogeochemistry.

Other related interests include wildlife conservation, British mammals, and using scent dogs for conservation. 

Qualifications

Biology (Conservation) BSc at Bath Spa University 

Environmental Consultancy MSc at Plymouth University

Professional membership

CIEEM (Student)

Research interests

Studying a PhD on the ecological and biogeochemical benefits of environmental enhancements at Moorlinch (and beyond) on the Somerset Levels.

I am working with Wessex Water and Natural England to invest in habitat improvement works, focusing on the creation of wetland features within the Moorlinch National Nature Reserve and SSSI, including creation of an inlet wetland, ditch realignment work, and construction of scrapes and shallow pools; to create a better habitat quality. Researching on the colonisation of the newly created wetland habitats and their effectiveness for water quality improvement, specifically phosphorus reduction and biogeochemistry, therefore better informing our understanding of improving ecological diversity and resilience.