Dr Orlando Goodall
Profiles

Dr Orlando Goodall

Lecturer in Criminology

School of Law, Criminology and Government (Faculty of Arts and Humanities)

Role

I lecture in criminology at Plymouth University. 

Qualifications

BA - Kingston University London (2012)

MA - University College London (2013)

Ph.D - Cardiff University (2019)

I worked at the International State Crime Initiative (Kings College London) on a major project funded by the ESRC prior to undertaking my Ph.D research.

Teaching interests

I currently teach criminological theory. I am module lead for stage two critical theories of criminology.

My main interests are: 

Critical realist philosophy of (social) science and it's application to explain problems; post-positivist aetiology and meta theory.

Social sciences theory.  

Political economy and structural explanations of harm.

Advancing realist social relations crime scripts.  

Wildlife, rural and food crimes. 

Crimes of the powerful, specifically crimes and harms organised by the state (understood as a social relation).

Research interests

My main research interest currently is advancing the original contributions of mundane fauna crimes and their causal explanations, using realist social relations scripts. This work impacts 'crimes against wildlife', primarily in rural regions, internally related to illicit food enterprise activity.

The research has policy implications for reducing crimes against mundane fauna within rural and meat enterprise processes; crimes which are causing unnecessary suffering to non-human species and have the potential to cause a public health crisis. 

Further, the research is re-conceptualising crimes against relatively common un-owned fauna and advancing a more precise account of the problem.

Other research

In addition to a book introducing the concept of mundane fauna crime, I am researching mundane fauna crimes as the unintended outcomes of environmental legislation (political economic conditions). In conjunction with this research I am currently working toward a 'wildlife crimes of the powerful' perspective.