Dr Orlando Goodall
Profiles

Dr Orlando Goodall

Lecturer in Criminology

School of Society and Culture (Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business)

Biography

Biography

I lecture in Social Science and Criminology at the University of Plymouth. I have worked for Penny Green at the International State Crime Initiative and attended seminars with Roy Bhaskar at the UCL IOE. My Ph.D research is the first empirical exploration of illegal deer taking and rural game industry food crimes in the U.K. I am reconceptualising illicit rural enterprise activity and wildlife crime from a CR perspective. My other research interests are dialectical materialism, international state crime and the metabolic rift. 

Qualifications

BA - Kingston University London (2012)

MA - University College London (2013)

Ph.D - Cardiff University (2019)

After my MA and prior to starting my Ph.D, I worked at the International State Crime Initiative (Kings College London) on an ESRC funded project. The work is now published - State Crime and Civil Activism: On the Dialectics of Repression and Resistance (Green and Ward, 2019). 

Teaching

Teaching

Teaching interests

I am module lead for three modules:

Critical Issues in Criminal Justice (Level 4)

This module equips students with the means to interrogate pressing political and social issues that impact society, such as austerity and privatization. With a principle focus on David Garland's classic work (2001), students learn about the emergence of the new penology (technocratic managerialism) and the new punitiveness (penal populism) as distinct but inter-related parallel tendencies of justice and penal policy. Their unanticipated and unplanned historical emergence from a contradictory basis of inconsistent neoliberal political economic conditions is a main focus of the module. 

Global (In)securities and the State (Level 6)

This module is based around the module leaders experiences working at the International State Crime Initiative. A critical, dialectical, state crime framework is elaborated while taking in an array of major historical events. Atrocity crimes, intentional human rights violations and the marginalisation, dehumanization and persecution of victims is a focus of the module. As is the failure of the international community, global structures and traditional criminology to answer for these most pressing of problems. 

Green Criminology (Level 6)

This module brings students a unique way of understanding contemporary crimes and harms against nature and non-human species. The module leader's own extended field work is used to theorise the problems relating to fauna, rural and food crimes. Critical theories are adopted to frame issues at the macro level, principally the ecological and metabolic rift, as advanced by Marx and currently John Bellamy Foster. More concretely the module leader's own novel conceptual framework helps students to think innovatively and critically about the antagonisms between human society and nature. 

This module uniquely benefits from the insights and expertise of senior level expert practitioners who give guest lectures. Accordingly, speakers include investigators from the National Wildlife Crime Unit, Devon and Cornwall Rural and Wildlife Crime police officers, Environmental Health inspectors, the Bat Conservation Trust and others. 

I guest lecture in criminological theory, sustainable development and postgraduate rural crime. 

Research

Research

Research interests

My main research interests are in applying critical realism to problems emerging from the relations between nature and society, conceptualizing and explicating illicit rural food enterprise activity (crimes of the personnel), and adopting dialectical materialism for the interrogation of the deviance of state actors, relations and structures (state crime). 

My current empirical focus is on advancing the original contributions of mundane fauna crime, illegal taking and the rural enterprise crime context, in the causal explanations of persistent industry-centric deviance against non-human species and its non-governance. This work impacts the ontology of what constitutes the victim and the necessary characteristics of 'crimes against wildlife', primarily in rural regions, internally related to illicit food enterprise activity.

The research has policy implications for reducing crimes against mundane fauna within rural and meat enterprise processes; crimes which are causing unnecessary suffering to non-human species (at detriment to their healthy reproduction) and has the potential to cause a public health crisis (when unsanitary foodstuffs enter legitimate supply chains illicitly). 

Publications

Goodall, O. (2021). Rural criminal collaborations and the food crimes of the countryside: realist social relations theory of illicit venison production. Crime Law and Social Changehttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10611-021-09976-9

Goodall, O. (2021). The Reality of Rural Crime: The unintended consequences of rural policy in the co-production of badger persecution and the illegal taking of deer, The British Journal of Criminologyhttps://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azaa095

Goodall, O. (2020). Beyond Wildlife Crime: Towards the concept of 'mundane fauna crime'. Criminology and Criminal Justice. https://doi.org/10.1177/1748895820981603

Goodall, O. (2019). Beyond Wildlife Crime: Realist social relations crime scripts of the illegal taking of deer. (ESRC funded unpublished Ph.D thesis). Cardiff University. 

Publications

Publications

Key publications

Key publications are highlighted

Journals

Goodall, O. (2021). The Reality of Rural Crime: The unintended consequences of rural policy in the co-production of badger persecution and the illegal taking of deer, The British Journal of Criminologyhttps://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azaa095

Goodall, O. (2020). Beyond Wildlife Crime: Towards the concept of 'mundane fauna crime'. Criminology and Criminal Justice. https://doi.org/10.1177/1748895820981603

Articles
Goodall O (2021) 'Rural criminal collaborations and the food crimes of the countryside: realist social relations theory of illicit venison production' Crime, Law and Social Change , DOI Open access
Goodall O (2021) 'The Reality of Rural Crime: The unintended consequences of rural policy in the co-production of badger persecution and the illegal taking of deer' The British Journal of Criminology 61, (4) 1005-1025 , DOI Open access
Goodall O (2020) 'Beyond wildlife crime: Towards the concept of ‘mundane fauna crime’' Criminology & Criminal Justice , DOI Open access