Skardon Garden

Amaranthus cruentus (prince's feather 'Golden Giant')

Skardon garden is the site of the University’s glasshouse facilities. With three Tomtech computerised glasshouses and various outside plots, this is where the plants are grown for laboratory practicals and undergraduate and postgraduate research studies. The glasshouses are also home to a collection of tropical plant species that are used to aid teaching of biodiversity, evolution and adaptation in the plant kingdom. These include carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and the Venus flytrap and epiphytes species such as bromeliads, orchids and the infamous Monstera sp. or ‘Cheese plant’ and various ‘air plants’ (Tilandsia spp.).

Amaranthus cruentus (prince's feather 'Golden Giant'). An undergraduate research project is looking at how resistant to drought this species is.

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<i>Amaranthus cruentus</i>&nbsp;
(prince's feather 'Golden Giant')



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<i>Amaranthus cruentus</i>&nbsp;
(prince's feather 'Golden Giant')



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<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>
<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>
<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>
The Pocket PEA meter (Hansatech, UK). The PEA measures chlorophyll fluorescence emitted during the electron excitation phase of photosynthesis. Chlorophyll fluorescence is used as a measure of the photochemical response of plants to different stresses.
<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>
These impatiens are being grown for a first year laboratory practical entitled ‘Plant Form and Function’. The packets shown are a biological control for a common greenhouse insect pest called thrips.
<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>
<p>Skardon garden plants</p>
<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>

Hordeum vulgare (barley). Undergraduate research students supervised by Dr Anne Plessis, lecturer in plant biosciences, are measuring the various effects of different stresses such as drought and heavy metals on growth and yield of barley.

<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>
<p>Skardon Garden plants</p>