Teaching and learning handbook: H-R

Teaching and learning resources H to R. 

H

Health Condition - long term, students: any student reporting a long-term health condition (a persistent or recurrent illness that needs long term management) that affects their study should contact the faculty office in the first instance with supporting medical evidence from a GP or hospital consultant. A form will be completed. The student's application will then be considered by the faculty. Additional advice and support is available from the Learning Gateway, UPSU advice centre and Disability Services.

Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR): From July 2015 all graduating students will receive  a Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR). This is part of a national initiative which provides a record of student achievement. The HEAR will include and extend the existing record of academic achievement; the academic transcript, and the European Diploma Supplement. This information follows the same documentation you will expect for students graduating from any university in Europe. It will also feature additional information relating to any extra-curricular activities which are formally recognised by the University – for example, the Plymouth Award, being a Student Ambassador or joining up to the Peer Assisted Learning Scheme (PALS). A full list of what will and will not be included is available in the FAQs.

Higher Education Learning Partnerships (HELP): the HELP CETL is one of 70 Centres of Excellence for Teaching and Learning (CETL). It established recognition and rewards for HE staff in FE, established Communities of Practice and further developed our Academic Partnerships. The HELP website outlines the CETL achievements.

  

I

Immersive modules: in year 1 there are 2 immersive modules, at the start of the first semester the introductory intensive module, and Plymouth Plus module at the start of the second semester. Seven Steps guidance to delivering Effective Immersive Modules 

In-class tests: students sitting in-class tests may have modified assessment provision as specified in their Student Support Document (SSD). Students and module leaders should discuss these requirements. For further information contact the faculty office or the examinations office at examinations.scheduling@plymouth.ac.uk or phone: +44 1752 587799.

Inclusivity:  students benefit from learning in an environment where they feel included and where they are taught in ways that recognise and support their needs as individuals, and as part of a learning community. The University’s commitment to inclusivity means its recognises and values  the diverse student body. The University strives to improve the success of specific groups, where research has shown that the route to educational success can be challenging. Being inclusive means creating a level playing field for all students rather than focusing on 'problem' students. The inclusive teaching, learning and assessment webpages contain a wide range of resources to assist staff.

Changes to the Disabled Students Allowance in September 2016 has resulted in staff needing to develop  inclusive teaching,learning and assessment and be ready to make reasonable adjustments for field and off campus trips. Guidance and a suggested template is available to assist Schools in their approach.

Inclusive Teaching and Learning: ensures all our students have equal opportunities to succeed and enjoy a positive and fulfilling student experience.

Indicative reading: this is indicative and not comprehensive. It should not be too extensive or overwhelming; simply refer to key texts, a very few relevant journals and/or a small range of web sites.

Integrated Structures Clinical Examinations (ISCE): ISCE is used in medicine and dentistry to assess both clinical and professional skills.

Intellectual Property: The University’s Intellectual Property  (IP)  Matters on-line resource contains the University  IP Policy and offers specialist advice, guidance and support that aims to maximise the commercial and socio-economic impact of the University’s research and knowledge base.

The University’s specialist  IP advisers  aim to :

  • Provide expert advice and education on Intellectual Property matters, its protection and exploitation, across the University, including to students;
  • Manage and optimise the University’s patent portfolio;
  • Provide expert advice, guidance and support on the commercialisation of University Intellectual capital, including spin-out and licencing opportunities.

Intended module learning outcomes: clarify what students should be able to do by the end of a module. They should be should be student centred and describe learning intentions. Guidance on design of learning outcomes.

International student office: contact the International Office at the Learning Gateway.

International students with a disability: assistance is available from Disability Services. Email ds@plymouth.ac.uk or phone +44 1752 587676. International students are not usually eligible for the same sources of funding as UK students and should explore possibilities of funding assistance within their home country. For information contact the International Office

International Tier 4 student attendance: It is important that attendance is collected for all Tier 4 students for compliance purposes. Please ensure that colleagues comply with our monitoring requirements as the University has to be able to demonstrate to the Home Office at any time that students are engaging with their studies.

Please see separate information regarding the University’s responsibility to monitor the engagement of Tier 4 students, and actions that are taken if a Tier 4 student is not attending or engaging with their course satisfactorily: 

Programme type Data require and frequency How recorded
Undergraduate programmes Attendance to be recorded at x4 core sessions per month, one a week (as a minimum)   S3
Postgraduate Taught programmes (taught period) Attendance to be recorded at x4 core sessions per month, one a week (as a minimum) S3
Postgraduate Taught programmes (dissertation period) Meeting with dissertation supervisor x1 a month S3
Postgraduate Research programmes Meeting with DoS / other supervisors x1 a month GradBook (meeting can be via skype if student on mobility)
Repeating students As above for taught programmes if repeating taught sessions, as above for dissertation period if resubmitting work / dissertation S3
ELC Attendance recorded at all taught sessions   S3
PUIC students (not integrated) PUIC use own monitoring methods / registers etc. PUIC systems, data sent to compliance
PUIC students (integrated) As per undergraduate students, above S3
Medical / Dentistry students Attendance recorded via locality offices, in line with the above   ADB, information sent to compliance

Internationalisation: access internationalisation resources. The Xerte e-module resource will help you with internationalising the curriculum. Information on the equality schemes and University data is available through equality and diversity.

Introduction to Teaching and Learning (ITL): this is a 20 credit Masters level module (accredited by the HEA) designed specifically for new staff actively engaged in supporting: teaching, learning and assessment activity in HE.  

K

Key Information Sets (KIS): comparable sets of standardised information about undergraduate courses. They are designed to meet the needs of prospective students and are published on the university website. The KIS information areas include:

  • student satisfaction
  • course information
  • employment and salary data
  • accommodation costs
  • financial and Students Union information. 

For assistance in fulfilling the KIS requirements read our guidance notes

 

L

Laboratory and practical work: the University must make reasonable adjustments and arrangements to ensure that all students can access laboratory and practical work. A Student Support Document (SSD) will specify individual requirements for disabled students. Consider any health and safety implications. Disability Services can offer additional advice and support. Guidance on inclusive laboratory and practical  work is contained within the Inclusive Teaching,Learning and Assessment webpages 

LearnHigher: one of 70 Centres of Excellence for Teaching and Learning (CETL), LearnHigher was the largest collaborative example of these. Partners from 16 institutions committed to improving student learning by providing excellent resources to support students' learning development, and through practice-led research into the effective use of those resources.

Learning development: Learning development offers a range of support to develop students' learning and skills. This includes online resources, one-to-ones, group tutorials and a drop-in-zone in the library. Students should visit the Learning Gateway for more information.

Learning Gateway: the Learning Gateway supports students in all aspects of learning at the University. It is situated in the Roland Levinsky Building. Phone +44 1752 587676 or email learn@plymouth.ac.uk.

Learning outcomes: convey precisely what students can expect to learn though a programme. They include the core intended learning outcomes and other learning outcomes achievable through opportunities offered in optional modules. They should be defined for each stage of the programme.

Library: The library is open 24/7.

Library Additional Services (AdLib): AdLib is for students and staff with disabilities. Services are also available for part-time, placement and distance staff/students, visitors, partner college staff/students. The support includes postal loans, and assistive technology.

Listening Post: The Listening Post is a confidential service where trained volunteer listeners can help students access support and find ways of dealing with issues. A drop in service is available in the Learning Gateway from 10 am-4pm Monday- Friday. The Listening Post is an initiative of the Student Counselling Service.

M

Marking and Moderation: our Moderation and Marking Policy specifies the Plymouth University process.

Marking and grading criteria: developing explicit criteria benefits staff and students. It is essential students are given clear information detailing the required standards, including the marking and grading criteria. This information should be easily accessible on the DLE, in module and in programme handbooks.

Staff need to have a systemic approach to marking that responds to student’s concerns of the reliability of marking.  For some examples download the School of Biomedical Science generic marking and grading criteria or PBS formative marking and feedback, or Geography marking grid  

Second marking is where an assessment is independently assessed by more than one examiner. Final year projects and dissertations are typically second marked. It can take the form of:

  • "blind" marking (where the second marker does not see the marks or comments of the first marker)
  • "seen" marking (where the second marker sees both marks and comments awarded by the first marker.

Marking - anonymously: anonymous marking is where an assignment or exam is assessed without students' identity being known. Refer to the PU Anonymous Assessment policy.   

Masters Learning and Teaching: A Bibliography

Materials available prior to teaching sessions: all students, including those with a modified assessment provision, benefit from being able to access teaching materials in advance of a session.  The Teaching and Learning Committee (May 2008 and reviewed in January 2014) agreed that materials should be made available electronically at a minimum of 48 hours in advance of a session.  The minimum standard to be adopted includes the following:

  • The outline and scope of a session
  • Preparatory reading
  • Key teaching materials e.g. PowerPoint presentations, support documentation, podcasts etc. should be uploaded in advance of the teaching session
  • This should be available a minimum of 48 hours before the teaching session, but a period of 7 days before the teaching session is recommended
  • All teaching materials must conform to the University’s guidance on copyright and intellectual property rights

You can achieve this by posting materials for sessions on the DLE. We know that in some circumstances it may not be possible to provide all materials in advance and academic staff may use their professional judgement; however this needs to be weighed against our obligation under the Equalities Act (2010) to make reasonable adjustments to prevent unfair treatment and to achieve equal opportunities for all our students.

Research has shown that posting of lecture materials in advance of the lecture does not have an impact on attendance. To view Babb & Ross (2009), go to http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360131508002029. Their findings suggest that attendance and participation are both improved by having slides available to students before classes.

For further information and advice contact Disability Services.

Mature students are recognised as those aged 24 and over at the start of their course.  Guidance for mature students returning to study and for academics on supporting mature students returning to study.

Medical conditions, changes to diagnosis: students are required to notify Disability Services if their condition has altered or if they have a new diagnosis. The student may benefit from their support requirements and SSD being reviewed. For information visit Disability Services in person at the Learning Gateway, email ds@plymouth.ac.uk, phone +44 1752 587676 or contact UPSU advice centre.

Mental health difficulties: if you have concerns over a student’s mental health you should encourage them to contact their GP or make an appointment with student counselling. Appointments for counselling can be made through the Learning Gateway on +44 1752 587676

Guidelines, action and information when dealing with students experiencing emotional and mental health difficulties or who are at risk of harm to self and others .
Mental health emergency (out of hours team 5pm - 9am) +44 300 330 5476.If you have serious concerns and a student is at risk of serious harm to themselves or others, is violent, has taken an overdose or seems out of touch with reality. Phone the Emergency Services 999 and University emergency internal number 3333 or +44 1752 853333.

For information on supporting students and staff with mental health difficulties Equitable Challenge Unit has produced Understanding adjustments: supporting staff and students who are experiencing metal health difficulties.



Military duties: officers or officer cadets serving with a University Officer Training Corps (UOTC) cannot be called up into full time active military duty. Military training events must be organised around the academic timetable. Extensions are not available for training events.  The student guidance document contains advice for home, EU and international students with military duty commitments.

Moderation: a process intended to make sure that an assessment outcome is fair and reliable and that assessment criteria have been used consistently. Forms of moderation include:

  • checking a representative sample of assignments
  • including examples of borderlines, firsts and fails, or where there is significant difference between the marks of different markers that cannot be resolved without the opinion of another marker
  • a review of marks where there is a significant difference between several assessment marks, within or between parts of a programme, which indicate the marks may need to be reconsidered.

The Moderation and Marking Policy will help you understand Plymouth University processes and requirements.

Example of moderation form. See an example of Plymouth Business School's moderation pro forma.

Modified assessment provision (MAPS): Modified assessment provision may include additional time, own room, computer or laptop, scribe or reader (this list is not exhaustive). In accordance with University regulations students requiring MAPS must be assessed by Disability Services prior to any provisions being put in place. Student Support Documents contain a student’s MAPS. For information contact the faculty office or Disability Services for advice.

If a student does not want to use their modified assessment provision it is important they sign a Revised RMAP form. This ensures students understand the process.

Module Box for External Examiners:  There is a list of  agreed subject/programme level briefing material sent to external examiners on initial appointment and as part of the annual update.

Module evaluation: it is important that each module is evaluated by your students. This enables modules to be reviewed and improved. The module evaluation template allows students to give anonymous feedback.

Module handbooks: should contain comprehensive information including:

  • learning outcomes
  • dates & times of all the module sessions
  • assignment details
  • assessment and marking criteria
  • much more!
TLQC 16 November 2015 agreed guidance for the minimum module handbook requirements on the DLE for each programme.

Find suggested content in the module handbook guidance.
Minimum requirement for all module course content    information on the DLE.

Module Leaders are responsible for all aspects of leading and delivery of the design, teaching, assessment, quality, updating, enhancement and student experience of the module. The Faculty of Business has produced a Module Leaders Handbook for guidance.

Module record (MR): summarise the learning experience and teaching methods that will be used for each ‘building block’ of the curriculum. All modules need to be approved on the standard University module record. Find details in the Quality Assurance Handbook and the Designing Programmes and Modules guidance notes.

Module record template (updated June 2017).

Module Review: Module leaders annually complete a Module Review. Information, the review form template and an exemplar Module Review can be downloaded from the CQO pages  (scroll down to Module Review)

Money problems: students should contact the UPSU advice centre via email advice@su.plymouth.co.uk or by calling +44 1752 588373.

Scholarships and bursaries information.

Student Funding Unit.

Moodle: There are also 2 short help-guides on minimum on line requirements for modules and programmes in the Key Documents section.  

N

National Student Survey (NSS): a national survey gathering opinions from final year undergraduates on the quality of their courses. See the latest results of the Plymouth NSS survey

Notifiable diseases: include:

  • meningitis
  • food poisoning
  • mumps
  • measles
  • tuberculosis (TB). 

If a student suspects they may be suffering from a notifiable disease you must insist they visit their GP who has a statutory duty to notify the Health Protection Unit (HPU). If necessary the HPU will contact Occupational Health at the University.

O

Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs): used in health-related degree programmes to assess clinical competence. Access online resources to support students at OSCE home and the General Medical Council

Occupational Health: Occupational Health provide support within the University and work with staff to prevent work-related illness and injury and assist staff to return to work following sickness absence. It is a totally confidential service.


On-line Peer Assessment System (OPAS): a tool to support peer assessment. Use it to collect feedback from group members on the level of participation and contribution that's made by each individual. You can then use the collective views of the group to apply scaling to the mark given to the group submission. There are a range of options for academic review and adjustment of the final calculated marks. Sign in and set up an OPAS system for a programme. (  internal staff )

 The  presentation  and videos  provide further information on how to use OPAS :

Originality checking software: is available for students to assist them in improving their knowledge and understanding of good academic practice, and for staff and students to assist with plagiarism detection. Understand the context and the use of Turnitin and other software through the Originality Checking Software policy. 

P

Panopto: Panopto is a video sharing system that allows academic staff to capture content in a simple and reliable way, using either an automated system or a manual recorder held on the academic’s laptop or desktop PC.

Why would you want to use it?
1. Previously recording lectures would involve filming the screen and presenter with a camcorder which is time consuming and requires special equipment and often resulted in poor quality videos.
2. Users are increasingly demanding that videos and audio are available on electronic mediums. Content capture technology allows the simultaneous recording of audio, video, PowerPoint and screen capture, and allows that content to be viewed on the web, and mobile devices.
3. Content capture enhances instructional activities; it works especially well in subject areas where students benefit from repeated viewing of content, especially when complex items are being discussed.

Parent partner spouse involvement: if a parent, partner, relative or spouse of a student contacts the University to discuss an issue or concern staff, are not able to discuss any issues without a student’s permission. In compliance with data protection you must advise the relative to discuss the issue or concern directly with the student.

Pedagogic research website (PedRIO): Pedagogic Research Institute and Observatory 

Peer review scheme, staff: enables staff colleague reviews and offers feedback on aspects of a colleagues teaching practice. Peer review resources

Peer assisted learning (PALS): experienced students work informally in group sessions with less experienced students on their programme to reinforce and discuss their learning. The PALS leaders work in pairs, offering support which supplements other activities such as lectures, seminars & tutorials. PALS should be both fun and friendly. The PALS Scheme is coordinated by Learning  Development.

Peer Support:  trained peer supporters offers friendly non-judgemental and confidential support to students from students. Drop in sessions are available Mondays and Thursdays 5-8pm in the Learning Gateway.

Periodic review: allows the University to ensure the coherence and relevance of taught programmes, academic standards and student achievement, the quality of the student learning experience and identify opportunities for enhancement. All programmes have a periodic review as part of a six year cycle. Find out more on the periodic review web pages.

Personal Development Planning (PDP): is defined by the QAA as ‘a structured and supported process undertaken by a learner to reflect upon their own learning, performance and/or achievement and to plan for their personal, educational and career development’. 

Resources are available for PDP.

Personal Tutoring:  promotes achievement and wellbeing. Ensures each individual student is known and valued and that their needs are recognised and supported. Personal Tutoring is part of our provision of high standards of academic and pastoral support. The Personal Tutoring web pages contain links to the policy,staff guides and role descriptors. https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/your-university/teaching-and-learning/guidance-and-resources/personal-tutoring

An self-evaluation tool to support  assist with personal tutoring 

This online self-assessment tool (PU staff and students) – set up in Moodle - evaluates students’ early engagement with learning. It provides automated feedback, helping to identify students at risk and directing them to appropriate resources and sources of support.

Placement, work based learning and work experience: when a student asks about a placement that is not part of their degree programme within an academic year, they need to speak with their programme leader, and the Learning Gateway

Students also need to explore any funding implications with the Learning Gateway or UPSU advice centre.

Visit the placements and work-based learning web pages for more information. 

Plagiarism and originality checking: Plymouth University defines plagiarism as "the representation of another person's work (including another student's) as your own, without acknowledging the source”. Read our guidance on plagiarism.

The Originality Checking Software policy explains the context and use of Turnitin and other software

Planning forms 2015/16: planning forms for new programmes or substantial changes (via Academic Development community). A University login required to access these forms. Further information is on the ADPC intranet community ( login required) 

Plymouth Compass: assists students'  navigation through the university experience, in both taught curriculum and extra-curricular activities. Compass identifies key attributes in four broad areas of student life - academic, civic, professional, and personal. The university offers opportunities to practice and develop these attributes, gain experiences, improve skills, and build networks for life beyond graduation. 

An audit tool is available for staff to map Plymouth Compass attribute development in the curriculum

Plymouth Extra: Plymouth Extra is designed to accredit, recognise and celebrate student achievements outside the curriculum.

Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP): this is a 60 credit Masters level programme (accredited by the HEA) primarily for academic staff engaged in the full range of: teaching, learning, assessment, research and professional development within HE.  PGCAP/TDF policy

Postgraduates: the Doctoral College provides a range of support for postgraduate education and students undertaking research degrees.

Postgraduate Teaching: Bibliography and policy for postgraduate research students who teach.

Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) a national survey managed by the Higher Education Academy and administered at Plymouth through the Doctoral College. It offers us the opportunity to benchmark the views of Postgraduate Taught students at Plymouth against a national aggregate and views of students in UK universities. It can be accessed through Student Surveys intranet (staff only)

Postgraduate Research Experience Survey (PRES):  PRES is a national survey managed by the Higher Education Academy and administered at Plymouth through the Doctoral College. It offers us the opportunity to benchmark the views of Postgraduate Research students at Plymouth against a national aggregate and views of students in UK universities.  It can be accessed through Student Surveys intranet (staff only)

PREVENT:  Higher education institutions have a duty of care to students, staff and visitors. The Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 introduced a new statutory duty for higher education institutions to have "due regard to the need to prevent individuals from being drawn into terrorism". This means that institutions now have a statutory duty to engage with the government's Prevent agenda. The government has published guidance setting out what steps higher education institutions are expected to take to meet this duty. The Safe Campus Communities website contains a wealth of information.

The Equality & Human Rights Commission,Equality Challenge Unit and Universities UK have produced guidance which provides practical advice on how universities can use the requirements of the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) and of the Human Rights Act, to deliver the Prevent duty in a proportionate and fair way for everyone

Pregnancy: if a student is pregnant you should advise them to inform their faculty office. You will find more information in the Pregnancy Policy.

Programme aims: specify the teaching intentions and curriculum coverage of the programme. They are written broadly but avoid aims that are so aspirational that they cannot be represented in the outcomes. They will reflect both the broader purposes of HE (e.g. employment, widening participation) and the specific subject aims

Programme documentation: information and guidance regarding programme documentation 

Programme handbook: a comprehensive guide to a degree programme.

Programme and module design: guidance on designing your programmes and modules

Programme Leads Forum - This on line forum is accessible  via the DLE it  contains information and guidance for programme leads  

Programme specification:  information and documentation to be included in  programme specification.

Proof reading of student work: students may engage a proof reader. A proof reader may highlight anything that needs correction or an omission. Examples include inaccuracies or ambiguities in grammar, phraseology, punctuation, spelling, consistency, structure and format. Students must make their own corrections as otherwise the proof reader becomes a co-author. All submitted work must be exclusively completed by the student except properly referenced material. Our policy on examination and assessment offences includes more details on proof readers and appropriate use.

Q

QAA Higher Education Review: to inform students and the wider public whether a provider meets the expectations of the higher education sector for:

  • the setting and/or maintenance of academic standards
  • the provision of learning opportunities
  • the provision of information
  • the enhancement of the quality of students' learning opportunities. 

Find out more about QAA Higher Education Review.


QAA Subject Benchmark Statements are part of the QAA Quality Code - Part A: Setting and maintaining academic standards.

Subject Benchmark Statements set out expectations about standards of degrees in a range of subject areas. They describe what gives a discipline its coherence and identity, and define what can be expected of a graduate in terms of the abilities and skills needed to develop understanding or competence in the subject.



R

Reasonable Adjustments:  Information pages about reasonable adjustments. All education providers have a duty to make anticipatory ‘reasonable adjustments’ to make sure disabled students are not discriminated against. Where a disabled person is at a substantial disadvantage in comparison with people who are not disabled, there is a duty to take reasonable steps to remove that disadvantage by:- changing provisions, criteria or practices, altering, removing or providing a reasonable alternative means of avoiding physical features and providing auxiliary aids.

An explanation of reasonable adjustments and examples are available. 

A guidance report  from the  Students Loan Company (SLC)  details  how to support students with additional needs. 

Additional information relating to the provision of reasonable adjustments for students training in regulated professions (e.g Health, Nursing  and Medicine )

HEOPS fitness standard guides  have been developed in consultation with the statutory regulatory bodies for a range of regulated professions is available.

The Equitable Challenge Unit have produced useful Guidance : Understanding the interaction of competence standards and reasonable adjustments. 

Reasonable Adjustments Review Panel (RARP):   this panel can be convened to discuss the needs of a student with additional needs prior to the offer of a place or  during their time of study at the university. Terms of reference for the  RARP  panel

Recording of Lectures: the Equality Act 2010  requires the University to make reasonable adjustments for students with a disability. This could include audio or video. When recording a teaching session it is important that students consult with DS and gain the permission  before the event. It will not  infringe copyright or data protection laws when any recording is used strictly for the disabled student’s private study purposes. Guidance for students on recording lectures.

Referencing: students need to be advised of specific referencing requirements in individual Schools. Find information on referencing  is available from Learning Development and Learn Higher. Lib Guide Cite them Right 

Reflective writing: students need to be able to write reflectively. The Guide to Reflective Writing is a student focus guide but can assist you to teach the skills.  Learning through reflective practice:  This open access  on-line course will help students to find out about reflection, reflective practice and learning from experience. 



Religious observance: this policy covers aspects of religious observance that occur at times known in advance. The BBC Faith calendar also contains information about key religious dates.

Remediation: is the process in the medical school to help students who are failing to progress. PUPSMD offer guidance to staff on how to conduct the process.

Research degree handbook: (University login required) contains regulations relating to postgraduate study.

Research Informed Teaching (RIT)
: Plymouth University is committed to enhancing the link between research in the disciplines/professions and teaching. The research-informed teaching webpages contain many resources. 

Research management: underpins research practice in universities, as well as impacting upon teaching through research-teaching links. Find out more in our e-module on research management

Resources  and materials available prior to teaching sessions: all students, including those with a modified assessment provision, benefit from being able to access teaching materials in advance of a session.  The Teaching and Learning Committee (May 2008 and reviewed in January 2014) agreed that materials should be made available electronically at a minimum of 48 hours in advance of a session.  The minimum standard to be adopted includes the following:

  • The outline and scope of a session
  • Preparatory reading
  • Key teaching materials e.g. PowerPoint presentations, support documentation, podcasts etc. should be uploaded in advance of the teaching session
  • This should be available a minimum of 48 hours before the teaching session, but a period of 7 days before the teaching session is recommended
  • All teaching materials must conform to the University’s guidance on copyright and intellectual property rights

You can achieve this by posting materials for sessions on the DLE. We know that in some circumstances it may not be possible to provide all materials in advance and academic staff may use their professional judgement; however this needs to be weighed against our obligation under the Equalities Act (2010) to make reasonable adjustments to prevent unfair treatment and to achieve equal opportunities for all our students.

Research has shown that posting of lecture materials in advance of the lecture does not have an impact on attendance. To view Babb & Ross (2009), go tohttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360131508002029. Their findings suggest that attendance and participation are both improved by having slides available to students before classes.

For further information and advice contact Disability Services.

Roles and responsibilities - Teaching and Learning: this document defines all the key roles and responsibilities associated with teaching and learning across the university including senior leadership, committees, administration and teaching staff.