Using Content Capture to faciliate a Flipped Classroom

Content Capture

The University is currently running a pilot project with the aim of developing a software solution that allows the capture of content that is available to learners at anytime from anywhere.

Flipping the class?

The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Short video lectures are viewed by students at home before the class session, while in-class time is devoted to exercises, projects, or discussions.

“Using Panopto to flip the classroom gave my students the chance to view the material multiple times if they needed to, allowing them to learn the content at their own pace. It also freed up that lecture session to focus on other things. My students loved it and I got lots of positive feedback.”

Dr Jeremy Pritchard, Senior Lecturer & Head of Education, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham


Before Class

Inverted Classroom

In an inverted classroom, teachers provide a complete lecture experience – typically including lecture videos or presentation slides with voice-over, textbook readings, and links to other resources. Students review these materials at their own pace, rewinding to review points as needed.

Micro Flipped Classroom

The micro flipped model seeks to take advantage of the adaptability of the flipped classroom. Educators share small parts of lectures (called “microlectures”) in advance, as well as select assignments to spur student thinking. Other lectures and assignments may be saved for classroom time. The format allows the teacher to better manage content – presenting more central or difficult information ahead of time for students to review at their own pace, while introducing additional information later in class.



During Class

Case-based Learning

Students prepare before class, and are assigned to small groups at the beginning of class time. Groups analyze a given problem or assignment and present a solution or recommended course of action. Teachers act as guides during class, engaging groups to suggest approaches or answer questions.

Team-based Learning

Students prepare before class and are quizzed over the content at the start of class (either as individuals or as teams). Students are given immediate feedback on their performance, and educators tailor the day’s lessons as needed with in-class micro-lectures to address gaps in understanding. Finally, students are assembled into teams for structured discussions or activities based on lecture content.



After Class

While the flipped classroom strategies at play may be different in every school, the central goals for all remains the same:

  • Make the classroom environment more engaged and interactive
  • Help educators quickly identify which students would benefit from additional instruction
  • Ensure that students leave the classroom not dreading another homework assignment but instead, ready to apply the knowledge they learned before class and practiced in class.