The Quaternary History of the River Nile
  • Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre, Plymouth University

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This spring's Mark Blacksell Public Lecture will be given by Professor Jamie Woodward from Manchester University.

Jamie's lecture will explore the environmental history of the world's longest river. It will consider long-term changes in river behaviour during the course of the Quaternary Period before focusing on the remarkably detailed records we now have for the present interglacial – the Holocene. 

This has been a period of profound cultural, climatic, hydrological, and landscape change in the Nile Valley. 

The talk will illustrate the distinctive geography of the desert Nile in Sudan and present some of the latest interdisciplinary work by geomorphologists and archaeologists seeking to understand how societies fared alongside a volatile Nile over the last 6,000 years or so.

The lecture starts at 6pm and everyone is welcome to attend (no booking required).

This event is supported by the Royal Geographical Society and will also serve as this year's South West Quaternary lecture.

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Speaker biography

Professor Jamie Woodward is a geomorphologist with particular interests in the nature and impacts of Quaternary environmental change in the Mediterranean region and the Nile basin. 

A good deal of his work takes place in close collaboration with archaeologists. Jamie is currently working on two projects in the Nile Valley of Northern Sudan with archaeologists from the British Museum exploring the relationship between human activity and environmental change over the last 10,000 years, work funded by the Australian Research Council and the Leverhulme Trust. 

He is Editor of the journal Geoarchaeology and recently published The Ice Age: A Very Short Introduction for Oxford University Press.

The Mark Blacksell Lecture, University of Plymouth, in association with the Royal Geographical Society (RGS)

The purpose of this series of lectures is to bring scholars working at the forefront of geography to the University of Plymouth to present their research to a public audience. The lecture series is named after the late Professor Mark Blacksell, a human geographer with unusually widespread interests and expertise. He was appointed Professor of Geography at the University in 1994, and served as both Head of the Geography Department and Dean of the Faculty of Science before he retired in 2003.

See details of previous talks in the series.

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