Mrs Amanda Denton
Profiles

Mrs Amanda Denton

Lecturer In Physiotherapy

School of Health Professions (Faculty of Health & Human Sciences)

Qualifications

I graduated with a BSc (hons) in Physiotherapy from Kings College, London. As a Senior Physiotherapist I specialised in neurology accumulating experience in a range of settings (acute, rehabilitation, community and private sectors), including specialising in Spinal Cord Injuries at the National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville. I undertook an MSc in Neurological Physiotherapy at University College, London. I first taught at Brunel University, London within the School of Health Sciences, moving to the School of Health Professions at Plymouth University in 2006. I have taught across the undergraduate Physiotherapy BSc programme in my specialist area of neurology.  I am programme lead for MSc Advanced Professional Practice Neurological Rehabiltiation a successful interprofessional programme for qualified health professionals which I led the validation of in 2008. Since 2013 I have been the MSc Advanced Professional Practice lead overseeing a range of profession specific and interprofessional Masters programmes. 

Professional membership

Professional memberships:
Chartered Society of Physiotherapy
Health Professionals Council
Association of Chartered Physiotherapists Interested in Neurology (ACPIN)
Multidisciplinary Association of Spinal Cord Injured Professionals (MASCIP)

Teaching interests

I lead postgraduate modules in neuroanatomy/ neurophysiology (ADV704 Neurological Rehabilitation: Sensorimotor Disorders) and an extended scope injection therapy skills (ADV708 Injection Therapy for Health Professionals -Botulinum Toxin). 

Research interests

My research focuses on increasing understanding of the impact of pathophysiology of neurological impairments on functional abilities and the development of rehabilitation interventions. I am currently writing up a body of work looking at the effects of temperature on neuromuscular function in people with hereditary and spontaneous spastic paraparesis and I am currently exploring potential interventions. Recent publications focus on this work. I have also been co-editor on two book chapters looking at exercise and spasticity management in people with neurological conditions. I regularly support our MSc students in their development of research ideas and carrying out clinically applicable research. Current dissertation projects are looking at the use of Saebo, the role of strength in femeroacetabular impingement and shoulder pain in spinal cord injury. 

Grants & contracts

2015: Denton, A The use of insulation to prevent temperatureinduced changes in function in people with hereditary spastic paraparesis IHCpump priming fund (£2,000)

2104:Denton, A and Marsden J. The use of insulation to prevent temperature inducedchanges in function in people with hereditary spastic paraparesis HSP Society(£2,000)

2014:Marsden, J, Matthews, M, Smith, C,Freeman, J, Denton, A (2014). A knowledge transfer partnership to explore thedevelopment of orthosis for pes cavus (£150, 000)

2011: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, PhysiotherapyResearch Foundation grant (£19,945)The effect of temperature on nerve andmuscle function in people with Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis. Principleinvestigator A. Denton. Team (Prof J. Marsden, Dr L Bunn, Dr A. Hough) 

 2011 - current Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, Physiotherapy Research Foundation grant (£19,945)The effect of temperature on nerve and muscle function in people with Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis.
 Working with wider team of Prof Jon Marsden looking at the effect of temperature on nerve and muscle function in people with CNS disorders

 2007-2008: Vice Chancellor's Research and Innovation Fellowship, University of Plymouth. Does the Drop Foot Stimulator improve community walking in hemiplegia? A series of case studies using the StepWatch Activity Monitor and conventional walking measures’ . Sole Applicant (£5,600). 

2005-6: Brunel Research Initiative and Enterprise Fund (BRIEF) award, Brunel University – ‘The effect of chronic electrical stimulation to forearm extensor muscles on cortical plasticity using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). Co-applicant (Cossar, J, Austin, A, Bond, B, O’Connell, N)  £15,000. 

 

- Stokes M (2011): Physical Management in Neurological Rehabilitation. Chapter 19: Physical Activity and Exercise in Neurological Rehabilitation – Co author with Bernhard Haas

- Cossar, J; Austin, A; Bond, E; Maskill D; Nowicky, A; O’Connell, N (2006). The effect of chronic electrical stimulation to forearm extensor muscles on cortical plasticity. Locomotion and Exercise, Physiological Society, University College London 2006.

Reports & invited lectures

 
 -2016 ACPIN Dorsiflexor muscle Weaknessand ability to generate force limit walking speed in people with hereditaryspastic paraparesis


  2014: European Society of Rehabilitationmedicine invited speaker (Marseille 2014). The effects of external warming onwalking and neuromuscular function in people with hereditary spasticparaparesis.

2014: HSP support group and AGM (2011, 2014) Invitedspeaker: Presentation of early data looking at the effect oftemperature on nerve and muscle function in people with HSP

2013: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy2013. Invited Speaker: The effects of temperature on nerve and muscle functionin people with hereditary spastic paraparesis.

- 2011:HSP support group AGM Presentation of early data looking at the effect of temperature on nerve and muscle function in HSP

- 2010: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Congress 2010 Poster presentation with BSc project studies group looking at the effect of taping on muscle strength. (student group runners up in student physiotherapy prize)

 - 2009: Stroke Research Network Poster presentation ."Does the Drop foot stimulator improve community walking in hemiplegia? A series of case studies using the StepWatch Activity Monitor and conventional walking measures" Abstract submitted April 2009