School of Law, Criminology and Government

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies with Law

Put your incisive mind and probing skills to best use as a decision-maker, policy developer or in assisting in the treatment of offenders. This course helps you develop the analytical and practical skills to examine how and why people commit crime and how we as a society deal with criminality. You’ll also develop your legal skills, studying the English legal system and method, law in context and choices from a wide range of other legal subjects.

You will boost your employability and gain hands-on experience by volunteering with local and national criminal justice agencies. You’ll also be eligible for entry into our Graduate Diploma in Law programme, enabling you to convert your degree to a 'qualifying' law degree.

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice with Law

We’re excited to announce that from September 2020 this course will be named BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice with Law.

Key features

  • Make a difference – draw on our inter-disciplinary approach to study, with a focus on contemporary issues, to gain real insight into the nature of crime, the workings of the criminal justice system and the society around you, and equip yourself with the skills to bring about change.
  • Equip yourself with in-demand skills – our graduates are highly sought after by a range of criminal justice agencies, including the police, probation, prison and youth justice services or find careers as paralegals and legal executives.
  • Boost your employability and gain hands-on experience by volunteering with local and national criminal justice agencies.
  • Open doors to a career in the private, public or third sector – highly transferable skills mean you’ll find career opportunities in a diverse range of settings.
  • Your Law minor means you’ll be eligible for entry into our Graduate Diploma in Law programme, enabling you to convert your degree to a 'qualifying' law degree.
  • To complement your formal learning we offer regular PALS sessions that provide the opportunity for you to learn with and from your peers. Share knowledge, discuss ideas, and ask questions in a relaxed and friendly environment.

Course details

  • Year 1
  • In your first year, you’ll lay the foundations for your studies, exploring perspectives on criminology and examining theories on causes of crime and deviance. You’ll develop an understanding of the criminal justice process in England and Wales, and gain a grounding in criminal justice research, examining crime in the context of economic, political and social frameworks. You’ll also be introduced to the key areas of law and gain an understanding of the English, EU and international legal systems.

    Core modules
    • CCJ401 Being a Criminologist

      This module makes use of contemporary examples of crime and justice to provide students with a framework for understanding how to develop their skills within the discipline of criminology. Students will analyse media constructions and policy developments with a criminological gaze, developing an understanding of what it means to think criminologically and to be a criminologist.

    • CCJ402 Introduction to Criminological Theory

      This module introduces students to criminological theory. The module addresses the importance of theory in criminology, critically examines a range of criminological theories, and applies criminological thought to a variety of practical concerns throughout history, including contemporary social life.

    • CCJ404 Crime in Context

      The module places criminology in the context of economic, political and social interpretative frameworks, and contributes to the creation of a criminological imagination. This module creates a learning environment that develops learner knowledge and the critical thinking skills needed to embrace a criminological imagination when considering how to interpret experiences and responses to criminological issues. A thematically structured programme guides students through the exploration of a range of contemporary issues in a manner that is focussed on the scrutiny of the social, temporal, spatial, political and economic contexts in which they occur.

    • CCJ405 Responses to Crime: A Comparative Introduction

      This module provides a broad-brushed overview of responses to crime in contemporary modern societies. It is comparative in focus, examining responses to crime both in the UK and in other jurisdictions, and it considers not only mainstream criminal justice responses, but also those that are informed by other rationalities, including social policy, risk management, and restorative justice. The module will include guest presentations from practitioners working in the field.

    • LAW1219 Legal Studies (Law Minor)

      This module focuses on providing an overview of key substantive areas of law with the integration of the development of legal problem solving skills for students on the Law Minor programmes.

    • LAW1220 Introduction to Law (Law Minor)

      This module focuses on providing an overview on the skills necessary to study law; of the English, EU and International legal systems; and of key substantive areas of law with the integration of the development of legal problem solving skills for students on the Law Minor programmes.

  • Year 2
  • In your second year you’ll broaden your skills – from learning how to assess, collect and use statistics, surveys, interviews and observational studies in researching crime and criminal justice, to examining theories of criminology alongside contemporary social, communications and cultural theories, urban studies, international relations and social harm. You’ll also have a choice of law modules including consumer law, tort and human rights.

    Core modules
    • CCJ501 Critical Issues in Criminal Justice

      This module explores cutting edge criminal justice issues and, drawing on critical criminological theory, interrogates their impact across criminal justice agencies, such as the police, courts, probation, prisons and youth justice. A particular focus will be placed on the wider social harms generated by criminal justice processes and their effect on vulnerable groups within society, including victims and offenders.

    • CCJ502 Theorising Crime and Harm

      This module takes recent developments in criminological theory and analyses the potential for criminology as a discipline to contribute to understanding, contextualising and countering some of the greatest challenges facing society and the planet today. The emphasis on harm tests the boundaries of mainstream criminology, and encourages students to think beyond social and legal constructions of crime.

    • CCJ504 Researching Crime and Criminal Justice

      This module prepares students for the level 6 dissertation module by providing an advanced understanding and comprehension of how to apply methodology to research aims. The module assesses the strengths and weaknesses of a range of quantitative and qualitative methodologies and provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained through course materials to a variety of real life scenarios.

    • CCJ505 Criminal Justice in Action: Structure, Policy and Practice

      This module offers students a view of the modern day criminal justice system, comprised as it now is of both state agencies (such as the police, courts, prisons and the probation service) and non-state agencies (such as voluntary/third sector and private/social enterprise agencies). Students will appreciate how the criminal justice system works with a range of offenders and victims, both at the statutory and non-statutory level. As well as looking at the system in England and Wales, other comparative examples will be included in order to widen students’ knowledge of how justice systems operate. The module will also engage practitioners working in the field as a way of extending students’ knowledge.

    • CCJ509 Employability Plus

      The module provides guidance, support and opportunities for students to enhance their employability. This module also provides guidance for students who have elected to undertake a placement at the end of stage 2 of their degree. On completion of the placement year students will return to sit stage 3. It is designed to build on skills learned in stage 1 and helps students become employability ready and, for those going on a placement, it helps in their search for a placement and in their preparation for the placement itself.

    Optional modules
    • LAW2215 Environmental Law

      The module provides an examination of key themes in environmental law, with a focus on the generation, application and enforcement of this law within a critical and applied context.

    • LAW2216 Human Rights Law

      This module focuses on the law relating to human rights with reference to national, regional and international law principles. It examines the development and scope of fundamental rights in both theory and practice, and the legitimate limits and restrictions on rights in the interests of balancing conflicting interests in democratic societies.

    • LAW2218 Family Law

      This module will examine the principles of family law from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

    • LAW2220 Cybercrime: Issues and Regulation

    • LAW2226 Tort Law (Law Minor)

      A module for Law Minor students introducing principles and concepts of tort law and examining the principles involved in a number of selected torts. The Law of Tort is concerned with the creation and imposition of civil rights obligations on people generally. It is focused on the legal protection of a number of key rights, such as the right to bodily integrity, reputation, enjoyment of property and privacy amongst others.

    • LAW2229 Jurisprudence: law, society and justice

      This module follows jurisprudential inquiries into themes and topics relating to the concept of law and the intersection between law and society. It analyses key ideas and theories on the development of legal concepts and regulatory frameworks. It adopts a broad range of theoretical perspectives from sociology, cultural studies and economics to examine the phenomenon of law, providing a platform for developing rich interdisciplinary discussion and reflection.

  • Optional placement year
  • You have the option to take a placement year in your third year of study.

  • Final year
  • In your final year, you’ll design and implement your own research project to produce your dissertation, working independently with the support of a member of our academic team. Choose from a variety of modules such as comparative studies, policing illicit drug use, anti-social behaviour, racism and criminal justice. Law options include criminal law, parents and children, media and information law, environmental law, European business law, and business regulation and corporate governance.

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

The following programme specification represents the latest course structure and may be subject to change:

Programme specification BSc Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies 6739

The modules shown for this course are those currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new modules. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to amendment from time to time as part of the University’s curriculum enrichment programme and in line with changes in the University’s policies and requirements.

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff

88 - 104

A levels
88-104 points including a minimum of 2 A levels. Excluding general studies.

BTEC
18 Unit BTEC Extended Diploma: MMM–DMM in any subject.

BTEC National Diploma modules
If you hold a BTEC qualification it is vital that you provide our Admissions team with details of the exact modules you have studied as part of the BTEC. Without this information we may be unable to process your application quickly and you could experience significant delays in the progress of your application to study with us. Please explicitly state the full list of modules within your qualification at the time of application.

Access
Pass a named Access to HE Diploma in any subject with at least 33 credits at merit/distinction.

IB
24-26 overall to include 4 at any subject at Higher Level. English and Maths accepted within: Higher Level = 4 Standard Level = 5.

GCSE
All applicants must have GCSE (or equivalent) mathematics and English at grade C or above.

Other
14-19 Diplomas: accepted – please enquire. Other combinations and non-A level qualifications also considered.

Short of the entry requirements for this course? Don’t worry you may be eligible for a foundation year to prepare you for possible entry onto this course for the following year.

We welcome applicants with international qualifications. To view other accepted qualifications please refer to our tariff glossary.

Fees, costs and funding

EU applicants should refer to our dedicated Brexit webpage for details of the implications of the UK’s plans to leave the European Union.

New Student 2019 2020
Home/EU £9,250 To be confirmed
International £13,400 To be confirmed
Part time (Home/EU) To be confirmed To be confirmed
Full time fees shown are per annum. Part time fees shown are per a number of credits. Please note that fees are reviewed on an annual basis. Fees and the conditions that apply to them shown in the prospectus are correct at the time of going to print. Fees shown on the web are the most up to date but are still subject to change in exceptional circumstances.

Undergraduate scholarships for international students

To reward outstanding achievement the University of Plymouth offers scholarship schemes to help towards funding your studies.

Find out whether you are eligible and how you can apply

Additional costs

This course is delivered by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and more details of any additional costs associated with the faculty's courses are listed on the following page: Faculty of Arts and Humanities additional costs.

How to apply

All applications for undergraduate courses are made through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). 

UCAS will ask for the information contained in the box at the top of this course page including the UCAS course code and the institution code. 

To apply for this course and for more information about submitting an application including application deadline dates, please visit the UCAS website.

Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email international-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.

Student societies

Our societies offer you the chance to expand your knowledge of the criminal justice system.

The Howard League student group and Crimsoc run events, invite guest speakers and arrange volunteering opportunities.

Learn more about our societies

Justice Works

Justice Works encompasses a range of activities within the Law School that aim to promote social justice.

Find out more about the work-based learning and volunteering opportunities open to you.

Discover more

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