School of Humanities and Performing Arts

BA (Hons) English with Spanish

Combine your love of reading and English literature with the study of Spanish, and get an insight into how languages and cultures interact. Experience the diversity of English literature and explore how writers use language to express their ideas. Gain the confidence to read, think and write critically and creatively, and add a widely spoken foreign language to your skill set. You will enhance your employability with this cross-disciplinary course, preparing you for a variety of career paths.

Boost your career prospects by working with a publishing house, literary agent, arts organisation or magazine on our work-based learning module or extra-curricular internships. Learn from internationally recognised research-active staff. Experience other cultures by studying or working abroad in either Europe or the US. Write and be published as part of INK, the English and Creative Writing student-run magazine, and be part of the wider languages community at the University.

NSS results for BA (Hons) English with Spanish

We’re very proud of our National Student Survey (NSS) 2017 return showing 96% of students found our staff are good at explaining things. 94% found the course intellectually stimulating, and 91% expressed overall satisfaction with the course.*

Key features

  • Choose from a wide variety of specialist modules, including period and cultural studies and creative writing. You’ll be taking two thirds of your modules in English and one third in Spanish. The focus of your Spanish modules will be on written and oral language skills as well as a deeper understanding of Hispanic cultures, allowing comparisons with your English studies.
  • Receive free set texts for all core modules throughout the three years.
  • Boost your career prospects by working with a publishing house, literary agent, arts organisation or magazine on our work-based learning module or extra-curricular internships.
  • Make use of our open-door policy and talk to your lecturers in a friendly and supportive learning environment
  • Learn from internationally recognised research-active staff, including published creative writers.
  • Experience other cultures by studying or working abroad in either Europe or the US.
  • Write and be published as part of INK, the English and Creative Writing student-run magazine.
  • Access resources at any time with the University library, open 24 hours 365 days a year, offering a vast range of electronic and print materials, including a rare books collection.
  • Be part of the wider languages community at the University with various activities including field trips to Madrid as part of your Spanish pathway, or learn another language in the evenings (including French, Arabic, Mandarin and German).
  • Don’t get lost in translation - practise your language skills at the Languages Cafe an informal setting to chat and socialise with native speakers from across the University.
  • Make the most of a rich cultural life with Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts programme and the University’s links with local arts organisations, like the Theatre Royal.

If you are interested in taking this normally full-time programme on a part-time basis please contact Rachel Christofides to discuss this possibility.

Course details

  • Year 1
  • In your first year, you'll study historical, theoretical, and aesthetic approaches to literary analysis. You’ll read literature which investigates the making of the modern world, and, if you choose, try your hand at creative writing. You will also learn key research and essay-writing skills. As part of your Spanish pathway you will learn advanced language skills and gain an understanding of cultural differences and inter-cultural communication, informing your study of English literature.
    Core modules
    • ENGL400 Journeys into Literature: The Odyssey and Beyond

      This four-week module provides an important foundation for new students studying English and Creative Writing. Based around one of the earliest written texts in Western literature the module engages with a number of issues to enable students to gain an understanding of the historical development of literature and the ways in which texts relate to each other over the centuries. It includes the study of genre, poetic forms, literary influence and creative interpretation as well as developing research and study skills including project work and collaboration.

    • ENGL402 Writing the Modern World, 1600-1700

      This module considers `modern¿ ways of writing, thinking, trading, seeing, and relating to others in the seventeenth century. The literature of this period first explores ideas central to our own time and place, and is crucial both to understanding literary history and to understanding ourselves. The course will be structured through four key narratives, traced through a chronological selection of texts:¿ authority ¿ modern ideas of gender ¿ global capitalism ¿ modern print culture.

    • ENGL404 Critical Theory

      This module will introduce some key critical theories relevant to the study of English literature. It will familiarise students with a range of theoretical perspectives and enable them to develop an understanding of different ways of reading literature, and its wider contexts.

    Optional modules
    • ENGL405PP Making Waves: Representing the Sea, Then and Now

      The four-week Plymouth Plus module fosters both analytical and creative skills, through problem-based, self-reflective, collaborative and interdisciplinary learning; students devise a major group presentation. Discipline-based skills are focused on the topic of the sea; close attention to classic maritime poetry and fiction encourages basic literary critical and creative skills. The analytical concept of waves is central to the module, and broadens the topic out to foster more general critical, theory-based thinking.

    • LCS101 Cross-Cultural Competence

      The rapid progress of globalisation makes the skills of international collaboration and cross-cultural competence essential attributes for future careers. The module develops these skills by introducing global theories of cultural difference and successful intercultural communication, and demonstrating their application in practical business / professional scenarios. Specific countries are also studied with particular focus, including presentations by guest experts.

    • OS106PP Our Ocean Planet

      In this module students will explore important topical issues associated with our ocean planet. Students will have a creative opportunity to work in teams on a topic of their choice using a project based learning approach. They will develop a variety of communication skills in order to present their ideas in a medium of their team's choice.

    • SFTA1 Spanish Fast Track A1

      This module is aimed at students who have little or no previous knowledge of Spanish, but who wish to make rapid progress. It develops communicative competence towards intermediate level, enabling students to establish social and working relations with speakers of Spanish, to negotiate everyday needs, and to communicate using spoken and simple written language in limited situations.

    • SFTB1 Spanish Fast Track B1

      This module is designed for students who wish to make rapid progress via a fast-track route at intermediate level. It develops their ability to use both the spoken and written language effectively beyond routine situations, to establish and maintain effective social and working relations with speakers of Spanish, and to understand key aspects of Spanish / Hispanic culture.

    • SPNX400 Spanish Advanced 1

      This module is aimed at students with A level or equivalent in the foreign language, or as a progression from Spanish 3. It aims to consolidate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and to provide a firm base for future studies. At the same time the student's communicative competence is developed through the study of materials of relevance to the foreign country today.

  • Year 2
  • In your second year, you’ll take core modules in Romantic and Victorian literature, studying these key periods from an interdisciplinary perspective, and engaging with debates in philosophy, science, psychology, politics, art, gender and race. You will also select from a wide range of specialist modules, including our work-based learning module. Your Spanish pathway will continue to develop your language skills, along with your understanding and appreciation of other cultures.
    Core modules
    • ENGL501 Romanticism

      In this module literary Romanticism, in its rich and problematic diversity, is introduced and explored through a consideration of imaginative conceptions of the individual in writing between 1790 and 1830. The study ranges through a selection of texts in verse ¿ lyric and narrative ¿ and prose - essayistic, theoretical and fictional.

    • ENGL506 Victorian Literature and Culture

      This module aims to introduce students to the Victorian period through an examination of literature read in conjunction with a range of other contemporary cultural documents including scientific, sociological, psychological, political economic and aesthetic texts.

    Optional modules
    • ENGL502 Gothic Fictions: Villains, Virgins, Vampires

      This module looks at eighteenth- and nineteenth-century novels to trace the variety and scope of literary contributions to the Gothic. It begins by discussing the origins of the Gothic novel, then moves to the heyday of the genre in the revolutionary 1790s, on to authors writing in the early and mid-nineteenth century, through to the decadence of the 1890s.

    • ENGL503 Dramatic Writing

      This course explores a wide range of dramatic writing and dramatic writing theory, integrating critical reading with creative writing projects. Class time will be spent discussing published authors/texts/productions, writing/reading theories, compositional processes, practical exercises, and student work.

    • ENGL504 Out of the Gutter: Graphic Novels

      This module will introduce students to the comics medium by providing a survey of the development of graphic novels/comic books, and focusing on several genres within the medium (such as autobiography, superhero, realism, journalism, among others). Students will read works by a variety of established comics artists/writers, theorists of the medium, and student work.

    • ENGL505 Rakes, Rascals and Rudeness in the Eighteenth Century

      Introduces historical & contemporary satirical theories; analyses satirical forms; enables critical engagement with the foundational associated modes: comedy, parody, irony and hyperbole.

    • ENGL508 Fourth genre: Creative nonfiction into the 21st century

      This module introduces students to the key concepts and issues in creative nonfiction. We will read classic and contemporary works of nonfiction, both short- and long-form, from sub-genres including biography, autobiography, travel writing, and reportage. We will produce our own works of nonfiction and critically evaluate them.

    • ENGL509 Women and Romanticism

      This module tests notions of `Romanticism¿ by asking how it looks different when viewed from a gendered perspective. The course incorporates well-known material and popular texts not normally encountered at undergraduate level. Developing knowledge of Romantic-era writing, the module attends to gendered norms, transgressions, and authorship.

    • ENGL510 Shakespeare and the Early Modern Stage

      This module provides an introduction to many aspects of Shakespeare's plays with emphasis on the practice and practicalities of playwriting for the early modern stage and on Shakespeare's plays in performance. Students will also be introduced to a range of critical approaches to the plays, from Shakespeare's contemporaries to the present day.

    • ENGL511 Apocalypse and the Modern Novel

      This module explores how fiction from the late nineteenth century to the present day has represented end of world scenarios. It will engage with issues of genre and form, and with appropriate historical and cultural contexts including the environment, spirituality, technology, and globalisation. Criticism and secondary sources pertaining to these issues, as well as to individual authors, will be considered alongside the primary texts.

    • ENGL512 Literature and History

      This module aims to explore the interface between literature and history. Using key ideas in narrative theory and historiography, it will examine the ways in which narratives of history are crafted through literature and how literary texts can impact on our understanding and interpretation of history.

    • ENGL516 American Novel

    • ENGL519 Working with Literature

      While remaining focused on English and English and Creative Writing projects, this module will provide students with the opportunity to apply their literary and creative skills in a 'work-facing' environment.

    • LCS200 Culture and Society 2

      This module examines a range of aspects which define Hispanic and Francophone worlds, focusing predominantly on the contemporary period. In addition, it develops a range of key skills which will support study at undergraduate level. For those students electing a languages Minor pathway, the module anchors linguistic competence through a deeper understanding of the cultural referents specific to these countries.

    • SFTA2 Spanish Fast Track A2

      This module is designed as the progression module for students who have successfully completed the first year of the Spanish `fast-track'. It will enable rapid progress, consolidating knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and providing a firm base for ongoing study. At the same time the student's communicative competence is developed through the study of materials of relevance to Spain and the Hispanic world today.

    • SFTB2 Spanish Fast Track B2

      This module is designed to enable rapid progress at an advanced level, further extending students¿ ability to communicate in more complex situations and their understanding of the structures of the language. Particular attention is paid to developing skills of relevance to a study or work placement in the foreign country.

    • SPNX500 Spanish Advanced 2

      This module is designed as a progression from Advanced 1, or for other students who have pursued their study of the foreign language beyond A level or its equivalent. It will further extend their ability to communicate in more complex situations and their understanding of the structures of the language. Particular attention is paid to developing skills of relevance to a study or work placement in the foreign country.

  • Final year
  • In your final year, you’ll complete your period studies core modules with the ground-breaking literature of early 20th-century Modernism, and you’ll choose from a range of specialist modules. Your Spanish pathway will further advance your language skills, and help you gain a more in-depth understanding of Hispanic cultures. You’ll also produce your own year-long dissertation on any topic of your choice, which you'll work on with the focused support of your personal supervisor.
    Core modules
    • ENGL603 Modernism

      This module will explore a number of themes through an examination of writing published in the approximate period 1910-1930. The themes will include structural and linguistic experimentation, historical and artistic influences, the First World War and literary networks.

    • LCS300 Culture and Society 3

      This module comprises a series of lectures on aspects relating to the French and Spanish speaking worlds, using sources (text, music, the media) in both the target language (for the benefit of Minor pathway students) and English. It requires independent research and analysis, with appropriate supervision.

    Optional modules
    • ENGL601 Project in Critical Writing

      The student will complete, under tutorial supervision, a project in critical writing in the form of a literary - critical dissertation based on an idea, theme, author/s, theoretical consideration etc: or a dissertation which arises from literary - critical interests connected to issues arising from the student's work in other English modules. Maximum length 12,000 words.

    • ENGL602 Project in Creative Writing

      The student will complete, under tutorial supervision, a project in creative writing such as a collection of poetry, short stories, a longer piece of prose fiction, autobiography, travel writing or other suitable modes which may draw upon issues encountered in other English modules and which includes relevant literary-critical material. Maximum length 12,000 words.

    • ENGL607 War Writing Since 1914

      The module will explore a range of the writings of war published in a variety of countries since the outbreak of the First World War. The writing will cover a number of wars with a principal focus on WW1 and WW2. It will involve the writing of both men and women in several genres.

    • ENGL608 American Crime Writing

      This module considers the development of twentieth-century American crime fiction from hard-boiled detectives, to myths of the mafia, and postmodern reinventions of the genre. This module will explore the cultural contexts of American crime writing, prevailing conventions of the genre, as well as challenges to those conventions.

    • ENGL609 Contemporary Poetry

      In this module we will examine a range of contemporary poetry and poetic theory as a way for students to learn how to compose their own poems. Class time will be divided between discussion of poetry/theory, writing exercises and peer workshops of student poetry.

    • ENGL610 Reading Jane Austen - then and now

      This module explores the cultural politics of Jane Austen's novels and of reading her work, both at the time it was written and now. Attending to social and historical contexts, the course selects some of Austen's major works, together with a selection of early and minor material and work by her contemporaries, to consider how we can read Austen as a novelist, as a political writer, and as a writer of `romance'.

    • ENGL613 Literatures of Environmental Crisis

      This module explores the ways in which contemporary literature and literary studies are responding to our current era of ecological crisis. It introduces students to the debates, modes of reading and key ideas of ecocritical literary criticism.

    • ENGL615 Professional Writing

      This module introduces students to the key concepts and issues in professional writing. We will explore technique in features and literary journalism; music reviews, opinion columns and longer immersion features as well as other contemporary works of non-fiction feature writing, both short- and long-form, from sub-genres including profiles and interviews, autobiography and columns, travel writing, and reportage. We will learn to research and produce our own works of professional nonfiction and critically evaluate them.

    • SPNX600 Spanish Advanced 3

      This module is designed as a progression from Advanced 2, and is normally aimed at final year advanced students of the foreign language who have not had an extended period of residence in the foreign country. It enables them to build on the advanced language skills that they have already acquired and apply these to more specialised and complex situations (such as presentation and translation).

    • SPNX700 Spanish Advanced 4

      This module is normally taken by final year students of the foreign language who have completed an extended period of residence in the foreign country. It builds on their increased fluency and confidence, and their personal experience of the foreign culture, and enables them to develop the application of their skills in more sophisticated and demanding situations.

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

The following programme specification represents the latest course structure and may be subject to change:

BA Hons English Programme Specification 2017 18 3605

The modules shown for this course are those currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new modules. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to amendment from time to time as part of the University’s curriculum enrichment programme and in line with changes in the University’s policies and requirements.

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff

120

A levels:
Minimum of 2 A levels, including Grade B in English, plus A/AS level Spanish grade D or above or evidence of ability to learn a foreign language (example GCSE grade A in language) or Ab initio (from beginners) level, excluding General Studies.

International baccalaureate
28 overall including three subjects at Higher Level and English at grade 6 at Higher Level. If overseas & not studying English within IB – MUST have IELTS: 6.5 overall with 5.5 in all elements.

18 Unit BTEC National Diploma/QCF Extended Diploma
DDM. Please contact the Admissions Team.

BTEC National Diploma modules
If you hold a BTEC qualification it is vital that you provide our Admissions team with details of the exact modules you have studied as part of the BTEC. Without this information we may be unable to process your application quickly and you could experience significant delays in the progress of your application to study with us. Please explicitly state the full list of modules within your qualification at the time of application.

All access courses
Pass a named Access to Higher Education Diploma (preferably English, humanities or combined), with at least 33 credits at merit and/or distinction.

GCSE
Mathematics and English language grade C / 4. If you do meet this criteria please seek further advice with the admission team on ug-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.

Equivalent qualifications may be considered.

English language requirements.

For a full list of all acceptable qualifications please refer to our tariff glossary.

Fees, costs and funding

New Student 2017 2018
Home/EU £9,250 £9,250
International £12,250 £13,000
Part time (Home/EU) To be confirmed To be confirmed
Part time (International) To be confirmed To be confirmed
Full time fees shown are per annum. Part time fees shown are per a number of credits. Fees are correct at the time of publication and may be subject to change.

How to apply

All applications for undergraduate courses are made through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). 

UCAS will ask for the information contained in the box at the top of this course page including the UCAS course code and the institution code. 

To apply for this course and for more information about submitting an application including application deadline dates, please visit the UCAS website.

Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email international-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.



INK magazine

Published by the Plymouth University Press, and supported by English and Creative Writing staff, INK is entirely edited and produced by our students.

The process of producing INK is as important as the end product. It's the chance for you to publish your creative work in a literary magazine.

Read the latest issue of INK

English and Creative Writing research

Our teaching is driven by research which in 2014 was rated among the best in the UK by the nationwide Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment. Our staff have published extensively and internationally across a diverse range of fields in literary criticism and creative writing.

For example, Senior Lecturer Peter Hinds, author of The Horrid Popish Plot, teaches and publishes on early modern literature and Professor Anthony Caleshu, prize winning poet, leads the Contemporary Poetry module.

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English and creative writing staff