Ruairi Glynn – BA (Hons) MediaLab Arts – now BA (Hons) Digital Art and Technology – graduate

Current employer: Independent artist

Current job title: Artist

Current location: London

“My course was amazing. We’d be doing graphic design for a morning, then maybe some media theory for the afternoon, then make a film in the evening, and then programme our own computer games late into the night.”

Tell us about your career path since graduation.

I went on to study architecture in London, which was heavily influenced by the undergraduate degree I’d gained at Plymouth. I was looking for ways to bring art, technology, and architecture together and built a series of interactive installations that attracted the attention of curators and galleries around the world. It was the combination of both my courses that helped me to find a niche and it’s helped me to develop my own unique and fulfilling career.

Has your career path changed since graduation?

I work with a very multi-disciplinary approach, and this was something I was first encouraged to do at the Institute of Digital Art & Technology in Plymouth. You don’t have to subscribe to any conventional creative or professional career path: you can create your own by looking for inspiration in both the arts and sciences.

What is the most difficult thing which you have faced in your career?

When I got a commission to produce a new piece of work for the Tate Modern I put myself under a lot of pressure to deliver something spectacular – which essentially meant big and technically difficult. So for a year I spent every hour and every penny I had on that one piece of work. In retrospect, it was an amazing experience but at the time I didn’t know whether I would manage to pull it off in time. I gained a lot of strength from proving to myself that I could.

What is the best, most exciting or fun thing that you have done in your career?

There’s lots of travelling. I have exhibited work and spoken at galleries and festivals around the world: from New Zealand, to Brazil, to Korea, to the United States, and all around Europe. It’s such a privilege to get to meet people of all walks of life and enjoy their food, music, architecture, and outlooks.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to get in to the same line of work?

Build a network. You can have great work but if no one has seen it then it might as well not exist. You need to be proactive.

How did studying at Plymouth help you?

My course was amazing. We’d be doing graphic design for a morning, then maybe some media theory for the afternoon, then make a film in the evening, and then programme our own computer games late into the night. I learnt how to curate exhibitions at the same time as code artificial intelligence. It was a truly original and brilliant degree programme and it gave me confidence to have a multi-disciplinary view about my career.

Inspired by this story?

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