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Mike McCulloch

 

Personal photograph uploaded by Mike McCulloch

Dr Mike McCulloch

  • Job title: Lecturer in Geomatics, School of Marine Science and Engineering (Faculty of Science & Environment)
  • Address: Room 111, Reynolds, Drake Circus,
    Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA
  • Telephone: +441752584967
  • Email: mike.mcculloch@plymouth.ac.uk


Role

Part-time lecturer in geomatics (the maths of positioning in space), with research interests in physics.

Author of Physics from the Edge

I have suggested a new cosmological model for inertial mass (called MiHsC) which predicts galaxy rotation without dark matter, & other anomalies seen in low acceleration environments. MiHsC predicts that inertia is controllable & a lab test of this is now being set up. The model also suggests a new, inertial, way to launch spacecraft & that the speed of light can be exceeded. There are articles about my work in New Scientist here, & in phys.org here here. My blog is: Physics from the Edge and I'm on twitter as @memcculloch. I am also working on a new quantum model for gravity, air-sea interaction and a new method of wave energy generation.

 

Qualifications & background


1988-1991. BSc in Physics at the University of York, UK.

1992-1995. PhD in Physical Oceanography at the University of Liverpool, UK.

1995-1998. Post-doctoral work at the Universities of Liverpool & Strathclyde, UK.

1998-2008. Ocean Scientist at the Met Office in Bracknell, then in Exeter, UK.

2008-now.  Lecturer in Geomatics (positioning in space) at the University of Plymouth.

 

Professional membership

Member of the Institute of Physics.

Member of the British Interplanetary Society.

Member of the Lifeboat Foundation.

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy 


Teaching interests

Geodesy & positioning (IMS5105). I teach geodesy/gravity & satellite positioning (module leader).

Marine positioning (EOE2309). I teach satellite positioning using matrix algebra (module leader).

Climatology (EOE3304). Predicting the climate using maths (module leader).

Integrated digital systems (IMS5205). I teach the maths of satellite positioning.

Positioning and GIS (EOE2308). The parts on geodesy and reference frames.

Field & professional skills (EOE2301).  One lecture on programming in UNIX/LINUX. 


Research interests

Physics, astrophysics, ocean & climate, always with a close link between experiment & maths.

Possible Undergraduate 3rd year projects:
 
1. Testing for the Maritime Casimir effect in a small wave tank (Practical skills, physics).

2. Wave forces on a boomerang-shape in a wave field (Practical test in a small wave tank).

3. Measure the drift of a boat or buoy caused by the wave-shadow zone of Plymouth breakwater.

4. How deep do raindrops penetrate in the ocean? (Dropping fresh water into salty water).

5. Use a 1-d model (GOTM) to show the effect of surface salinity on the ocean heat budget.


6. A sensitivity study of Stommel's salt fountain (Lab experiment).

Possible MSc Geomatics projects:

1. Testing quantised inertia using spacecraft trajectory data (Needs algebra, geometry). Link

2. Measure the drift of a buoys caused by the wave-shadow zone of Plymouth breakwater.

3. Testing for the Maritime Casimir effect in a small wave tank (Practical skills, physics).

4. Use laser positioning to measure the gravitational constant (G) using a torsion balance.

5. Discuss the analogies between special relativity and sound in water. Relativity for fish?

6. Modelling the mixing of rain in the ocean (Numerical experiment using GOTM).
Link

7. Can hurricanes be deflected by warm ocean eddies? (Needs statistics, data analysis). Link

8. XNAV: the feasability of Pulsar navigation: GPS for deep space.
 


Publications

McCulloch, M.E., 2014. The effect of cold rain on the ocean. Submitted to J. Marine Systems.

McCulloch, M.E., 2014. Wave energy from swastika-shaped rotors. Submitted to Ocean Engineering.

McCulloch, M.E., 2014. A toy cosmology using a Hubble-scale Casimir effect. Galaxies, Vol. 2(1), 81-88. Abstract (free pdf).

McCulloch, M.E., 2014. Gravity from the uncertainty principle. Astrophysics and Space Science. 349, 957-959. Abstract (click 'look inside' to see the pdf).

McCulloch, M.E., 2013. Inertia from an asymmetric Casimir effect. EPL, 101, 59001 (free pdf). arXiv: 1302.2775

McCulloch, M.E., 20??. Does inertia fail at light speed? Submitted to JBIS on the 10th April 2012..

McCulloch, M.E., 2012. Testing quantised inertia on galactic scales. Astrophysics and Space Science, Vol. 342, No. 2, 575-578. Journal. Preprint

Font et al., 2012. SMOS first data analysis for sea surface salinity determination. Int. J. Rem. Sensing (iFirst).

McCulloch, M.E., P. Spurgeon, A. Chuprin, 2012. Have mid-latitude ocean rain-lenses been seen by the SMOS satellite?. Ocean Modelling, Vols. 43-44, p108-111. Journal paper (free)

McCulloch, M.E., 20??. Quantised inertia and faster than light travel. Submitted to 100YSS/JBIS, Sept' 2011.

McCulloch, M.E., 2011. Can the Podkletnov effect be explained by quantised inertia? Physics procedia, 20, 134-139Journal, Preprint

McCulloch, M.E., 2011. The Tajmar effect from quantised inertia. EPL, 95, 39002. Abstract (EPL) (free access to the pdf). Preprint (Selected by the journal to be in its 'Best of 2011 collection').

Spurgeon, P. et al., 2010. Ocean salinity retrieval approaches for the SMOS satellite. ESA Living Planet Symposium, Bergen, Norway, 2010. Proceedings, SP-686. pdf file

McCulloch, M.E., 2010. Minimum accelerations from quantised inertia. EPL, 90, 29001 (4pp). Journal pdf (not free). Preprint: http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.3303

Font J. et al., 2010. Overview of SMOS level 2 ocean salinity processing and first results. IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium 2010. IGARSS, p3146-3149.

McCulloch, M.E., 2010. Can the Tajmar effect be explained using a modification of inertia? EPL, 89, 19001 (4pp). Journal pdf (not free).  Preprint. Selected by the journal for its "Best of 2010 collection".

McCulloch, M.E., 2008. Modelling the flyby anomalies using a modification of inertia. Mon. Not. Royal. Astro. Soc., Letters, 389 (1), L57-60. Journal pdf (free). Preprint:  arXiv:/astro-ph/0806.4159

McCulloch, M.E., 2008. Can the flyby anomalies be explained by a modification of inertia? J. British Interplanetary Soc., Vol. 61, 373-378. Journal pdf (not free). Preprint: arXiv:/astro-ph/0712.3022 

McCulloch, M.E., J.T.Heming, J.D.Stark, 2008. Hurricane deflection by sea surface temperature anomalies. 28th Conference on Hurricanes & Tropical Meteorology, Orlando, Florida, US.

McCulloch, M.E., 2007. Modelling the Pioneer anomaly as modified inertia. Mon. Not. Roy. Astro. Soc., 376, 338-342. Journal pdf (free). Preprint: http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0612599/

Stark, J.D., C.J.Donlon, M.J.Martin and M.E.McCulloch, 2007. OSTIA: an operational, high resolution, real time, global sea surface temperature analysis system. Oceans '07 IEEE Aberdeen, conference proceedings. Vol 1-3, 331-334.

McCulloch, M.E., 2006. The effect of ocean currents on surface storm waves. Met Office, NCOF Technical Note, Number 4.

McCulloch, M.E., J.O.S.Alves & M.J.Bell, 2004. Modelling shallow mixed layers in the northeast Atlantic. J. Marine Systems, Vol. 52(1-4), pp 107-119. journal paper (free)

Leach, H., S.J. Bowerman, M.E. McCulloch, 2002. Upper ocean eddy transports of heat, potential vorticity and volume in the Northeastern North Atlantic. J. Phys. Oceanogr, 32 (10), 2926-2937.

McCulloch, M.E., 1998. Air-sea heat fluxes derived from sub-surface data in the Northeast Atlantic. Physics & Chemistry of the Earth, 23, No.5/6, 527-530.

McCulloch, M.E. and H. Leach, 1998. Air-sea fluxes inferred from an upper ocean heat budget northeast of the Azores. Q. J. Royal Met. Soc., 125, No.551, Part A, 2465.

Leach,H and R.T.Pollard et al., 1998. RRS Discovery Cruise 223 Report, 28 September - 19 November 1996.  Southampton Oceanography Centre.

McCulloch, M.E., 1997. Inferring heat content changes from single hydrographic sections. Ocean Modelling, 113, 1-4.

McCulloch, M.E. and H. Leach, 1997. Seasonal heat and freshwater budgets of the upper ocean in the Northeast Atlantic. Q.J. Royal Met. Soc., 123, 767-784.

Leach, H, M.E. McCulloch, J. Bauer et al., 1995. Compendium of SEA ROVER long sections. Report, Liverpool University.

McCulloch, M.E., 1995. Seasonal heat and freshwater fluxes in the Northeast Atlantic. PhD thesis , Liverpool University.

McCulloch, M.E., 1993. Bubbles in accelerated reference frames, or: General relativity and cider do mix. POLemic (Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Newsletter, Winter 1993). 

Reports & invited lectures

2012. Invited to talk to the Physics Dept at St Andrews University on "Can inertia be modified electromagnetically?"

2011. Invited to talk at the NASA/DARPA 100 Year Starship Symposium in Orlando, US on "Quantised inertia and FTL".

2009 & 2010. Invited to talk at the International Flyby Anomaly Collaboration, at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland. 



Links

My blog "Physics from the Edge":

http://physicsfromtheedge.blogspot.com/

I have written several short stories that are available on the H2G2 website here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/U246476

My older webpage with the University of Exeter's Astrophysics Group:

http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/mem/